What will Leveson say about media ownership?

Miliband called for a cap of 20-30 per cent on newspaper market share when he appeared before the inquiry.

One of the best arguments against statutory regulation of the press is that most of the abuses the Leveson inquiry was set up to examine, such as phone-hacking, bribery and the corruption of public officials, are already illegal. But, most obviously in the case of News International, the law has too often proved feeble in the face of media pressure. At least one reason for this is NI's overweening dominance of the market; even after the closure of the News of the World, it still commands 34 per of newspaper circulation. It's also worth remembering that had it not been for the Milly Dowler phone-hacking revelations, News Corporation would almost certainly have acquired 100 per cent of BSkyB.

In views of this, it's worth asking what (if anything) the Leveson report will say about media ownership, an issue that has been little discussed in recent weeks. When Ed Miliband gave evidence to the inquiry in June, he called for a cap of between 20-30 per cent on newspaper market share, a measure that would entail the break-up of News International. If Miliband wants to burnish his radical credentials, he should return to this subject when he responds to David Cameron tomorrow.

Rupert Murdoch's News International currently accounts for 34 per cent of UK newspaper circulation. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.