PMQs review: Cameron leaves the Tories wanting more

The PM demolished Miliband as he declared that the Labour leader had "impersonated more politicians than Rory Bremner".

After a series of unnoteworthy exchanges between David Cameron and Ed Miliband on Gaza and the NHS, today's PMQs came to life right at the end. After Miliband declared that "the people of Corby spoke for the country", Cameron replied that "the people of Humberside spoke for the entire nation", a reference to John Prescott's defeat in last week's police and crime commissioner elections, which Prescott unfortunately described as "a referendum on everything the coalition has done".

This artful riposte prompted cheers from Tory MPs, with Cameron responding, "happily, there is more". And there was. After noting that Miliband had invoked Disraeli, compared himself to Thatcher, described himself as more eurosceptic than Bill Cash, and more pro-European than Tony Blair, he quipped: "he's impersonated more politicians than Rory Bremner, but this time the joke's on him". It was Cameron's best line for months and as the PM sat down, Tory MPs cried, "more! more!

Until that point, Miliband had had the better of the exchanges, with Cameron unable to answer the charge that he had broken his promise to prevent rationing on cost in the NHS. As the PM leaned over to Andrew Lansley, Miliband quipped, "don't ask him for advice, you sacked him!" But the Labour leader then unwisely segued into last week's elections, allowing Cameron to deliver his knockout blow.

David Cameron leaves Stormont Castle in Belfast, Northern Ireland on 20 November 2012. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

A second referendum? Photo: Getty
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Will there be a second EU referendum? Petition passes 1.75 million signatures

Updated: An official petition for a second EU referendum has passed 1.75m signatures - but does it have any chance of happening?

A petition calling for another EU referendum has passed 1.75 million signatures

"We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the remain or leave vote is less than 60% based a turnout less than 75% there should be another referendum," the petition reads. Overall, the turnout in the EU referendum on 23 June was 73 per cent, and 51.8 per cent of voters went for Leave.

The petition has been so popular it briefly crashed the government website, and is now the biggest petition in the site's history.

After 10,000 signatures, the government has to respond to an official petition. After 100,000 signatures, it must be considered for a debate in parliament. 

Nigel Farage has previously said he would have asked for a second referendum based on a 52-48 result in favour of Remain.

However, what the petition is asking for would be, in effect, for Britain to stay as a member of the EU. Turnout of 75 per cent is far higher than recent general elections, and a margin of victory of 20 points is also ambitious. In the 2014 independence referendum in Scotland, the split was 55-45 in favour of remaining in the union. 

Unfortunately for those dismayed by the referendum result, even if the petition is debated in parliament, there will be no vote and it will have no legal weight. 

Another petition has been set up for London to declare independence, which has attracted 130,000 signatures.