Obama re-elected as Romney concedes defeat

US president wins decisive re-election after securing key swing states.

Several hours after the US networks called the presidential election for Barack Obama, Mitt Romney has just delivered his concession speech in Boston. In a short and gracious address, he told the crowd that he had made the traditional phone call to "congratulate" Obama on his victory. Romney added:

This is a time of great challenges for America and I pray the president will be successful in guiding our nation.

I so wish that I had been able to fulfill our hopes to lead the country in a different direction but the nation chose another leader.

With Obama already topping 300 Electoral College votes (he required 270 to win), and Florida still to declare, his margin of victory is looking as large as the final swing state polls suggested. After he secured re-election by taking Ohio, the US President tweeted the above photo, with the message "four more years".

However, with the Republicans retaining control of the House of Representatives, he will soon be forced to confront the threat of renewed political gridlock.

The photo tweeted by Barack Obama after he secured re-election.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.