Never mind the EBacc - the arts are already second class subjects

Tough on art, tough on the causes of art.

"When I hear the word culture I reach for my gun": Goering, the James Bond franchise, and now the UK government.

The new EBacc has left art and music out of its core curriculum, providing such a disincentive for these subjects that 27 per cent of schools have withdrawn related subjects from the curriculum, according to Ipsos Mori research.

A number of high profile figures in the arts expressed their concern to the Guardian. If the trend continues "we risk ending up with a two-tier system where arts are regarded as second-class subjects", Cultural Learning Alliance's Lizzie Crump told the Guardian.

Too late Lizzie Crump! The arts have been second class subjects for some time. In 2011, the postgrad places for trainee teachers were reduced by 220 places for art and 180 places for music. 206 arts companies lost their core funding last year, according to the 2011 spending review, and one in ten shut down as a result. And last week 117 jobs were cut at the Arts Council England, which has reduced internal costs by half. (It plans to cut a fifth of its workforce by July).

The way the trend is going, even if we can save art qualifications there'll be little use for them in a few years time. No wonder the Guardian's commenters are arguing for the arts on the basis of their psychological benefits, rather than their career prospects.

Shooting the arts in the face. Photograph: Getty Images

Martha Gill writes the weekly Irrational Animals column. You can follow her on Twitter here: @Martha_Gill.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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