Neil O'Brien appointed special adviser to Osborne

Policy Exchange director will focus on developing the Conservatives' next manifesto.

George Osborne has just completed his second big signing of the week. After naming Mark Carney as governor of the Bank of England on Monday, he's secured the services of Policy Exchange director Neil O'Brien as a special adviser. O'Brien, who has been director of the cente-right think-tank since 2008, will focus on the development of the Conservatives' next general election manifesto.

It's a smart move by Osborne; O'Brien, a New Statesman contributor, is one of the most innovative conservative thinkers of his generation and a moderniser who understands what the Tories need to do if they're to stand a chance of winning in 2015. In a piece for the NS last month ("The challenge for the Tories is to find their own version of Blairism"), he wrote:

At the next election, Tory candidates need a clearer offering for those who work hard on low incomes; something to say to the fifth of households that live in social housing; and an agenda that makes sense to people in areas of high unemployment and to the millions who work in public services.

As he showed in another piece for the NS, on the meaning of "Milibandism", he also understands the threat posed by Labour.

Policy Exchange deputy director David Skelton, another NS contributor, will serve as acting director while the think-tank looks for a replacement for O’Brien. Congratulations to both.

Neil O'Brien has served as director of Policy Exchange since 2008.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.