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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Beware the vitriol Tories reserve for the BBC (Guardian)

We shouldn't buy into this right-wing hysteria – Conservatives will seize on any excuse to dismantle the corporation, writes Diane Abbott.

2. New sheriffs in town – but will law and order change? (Daily Telegraph)

Wiith the election of police and crime commissioners, political parties are missing a major chance to improve justice in towns and cities, says Mary Riddell.

3. The BBC should learn from the Birt era (Financial Times)

The corporation should not confuse a change of personnel with a renewal of its strategy and output, writes James Purnell.

4. There is something profoundly wrong with a Britain where only the 'little people' pay taxes (Daily Mail)

A seedy amorality over paying tax has spread throughout the upper echelons of our society, writes Ian Birrell.

5. Britain’s door is too open to foreign tycoons (Times) (£)

The City’s reputation has taken a battering recently, writes David Wighton. That’s why we must be wary about who does business here.

6. Why Obama is more than Bush with a human face (Guardian)

Ground-floor thinking can give Obama lift-off, writes Slavoj Žižek. His reforms have already touched a nerve at the core of the US ideological edifice.

7. Police commissioners are worth voting for (Independent)

Flawed or not, this week's ballot will give the public a say for the first time, says an Independent leader.

8. Europe is messing up Merkel’s union (Financial Times)

If Germany can’t head off crises its citizens will pay for, unhappiness will turn to fury, says Sebastian Mallaby.

9. Bureaucracy has become the BBC's dieback disease (Guardian)

So unwieldy is its vast, multilayered hierarchy that the corporation has lost all capacity to allocate blame for its mistakes, says Simon Jenkins.

10. Whether you like it or not, the era of much smaller government is fast approaching in Britain (Independent)

We are at the end of a set of ideas that have prevailed for the best part of a century, writes Hamish McRae.