Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Beware the vitriol Tories reserve for the BBC (Guardian)

We shouldn't buy into this right-wing hysteria – Conservatives will seize on any excuse to dismantle the corporation, writes Diane Abbott.

2. New sheriffs in town – but will law and order change? (Daily Telegraph)

Wiith the election of police and crime commissioners, political parties are missing a major chance to improve justice in towns and cities, says Mary Riddell.

3. The BBC should learn from the Birt era (Financial Times)

The corporation should not confuse a change of personnel with a renewal of its strategy and output, writes James Purnell.

4. There is something profoundly wrong with a Britain where only the 'little people' pay taxes (Daily Mail)

A seedy amorality over paying tax has spread throughout the upper echelons of our society, writes Ian Birrell.

5. Britain’s door is too open to foreign tycoons (Times) (£)

The City’s reputation has taken a battering recently, writes David Wighton. That’s why we must be wary about who does business here.

6. Why Obama is more than Bush with a human face (Guardian)

Ground-floor thinking can give Obama lift-off, writes Slavoj Žižek. His reforms have already touched a nerve at the core of the US ideological edifice.

7. Police commissioners are worth voting for (Independent)

Flawed or not, this week's ballot will give the public a say for the first time, says an Independent leader.

8. Europe is messing up Merkel’s union (Financial Times)

If Germany can’t head off crises its citizens will pay for, unhappiness will turn to fury, says Sebastian Mallaby.

9. Bureaucracy has become the BBC's dieback disease (Guardian)

So unwieldy is its vast, multilayered hierarchy that the corporation has lost all capacity to allocate blame for its mistakes, says Simon Jenkins.

10. Whether you like it or not, the era of much smaller government is fast approaching in Britain (Independent)

We are at the end of a set of ideas that have prevailed for the best part of a century, writes Hamish McRae.

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Labour picks Gillian Troughton to fight Copeland by-election

Troughton, a Copeland councillor, was critical of Jeremy Corbyn during the summer leadership race. 

Labour has picked Gillian Troughton, pro-nuclear former doctor to fight the Copeland by-election.

After accepting the nomination, in an email shared online, Troughton said she was "pro-nuclear; no ifs, no buts", and that her husband worked in the nuclear supply chain. She is also a local councillor and a practising Christian. 

She described the election as a choice about the NHS: "I have been part of the campaign against the proposed cuts to A&E and the maternity wing because I know that our community needs this service."

Like Jamie Reed, the current MP for Copeland, Troughton is a critic of Jeremy Corbyn and backed Owen Smith in the 2016 Labour leadership campaign.

She also campaigned to remain in the EU, and now must win over a voting population that voted 62 per cent to leave - the strongest Eurosceptic vote in Cumbria. 

Her victory is a symbolic defeat for the Labour leadership, as she beat Corbyn supporter Rachel Holliday, also a councillor with ties to the nuclear industry and the NHS. 

However, the decision to pick a non-Corbynite may be a relief for those within the Labour leader's camp who worry about "owning" a possible by-election defeat. 

Corbyn said of the selection: “I am delighted that Gillian Troughton will be Labour’s candidate for the Copeland by-election. 

“Gillian is a local councillor with a strong track record of getting things done for her community. She has campaigned tirelessly to maintain local hospital services. 

“As a St John’s blue light ambulance driver, Gillian has seen first-hand the extent of the crisis caused by this Conservative government, which has chosen to fund tax cuts for the wealthiest instead of our health service. 

“I am proud that Labour has selected a local candidate with such dedication to her community.”

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.