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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-reads from this morning's comment pages.

New Statesman
  1. We protested against violence in Gaza, but this time we weren't called traitors (Guardian
    Step by step, the protests of the radical Israeli left can help to change fossilised political attitudes, writes Joshua Sobol.
  2. Call a truce, before centuries of free speech are brought to an end (Telegraph)
    With MPs eager to take power over the press, the Prime Minister must lead them back from the cliff edge, argues Fraser Nelson.
  3. A scheme designed to net trillions from global tax havens is being scuppered (Guardian)
    Switzerland and other offshore specialists are doing their best to frustrate international transparency in taxation, writes Nicholas Shaxson
  4. Why is Barack Obama swanning around Asia as the Middle East goes up in flames? (Independent)
    The most clear-sighted and intellectual President in a century or more is in the wrong place, writes Adrian Hamilton
  5. EU budget: it is selfish of Eurosceptics to try to force David Cameron’s hand (Telegraph)
    With Europe on the brink, now is the time for magnanimity, not self-serving posturing, writes Peter Oborne.
  6. Britain’s policy echoes Habsburg decline (Financial Times, £)
    The main message of the Bank of England’s recent inflation report is that the outlook is gloomy and the risks are on the downside, but nothing much can be done about it, argues Samuel Brittan.
  7. Doping prisoners harms them – and us too (Telegraph)
    Treating inmates with drugs such as methadone is a sure way to increase crime, writes Will Self
  8. Don’t underestimate Miliband. He’s like Attlee (Times, £)
    I’ve known all the Labour leaders back to 1935. This one understands the need for unity, writes William Rees-Mogg
  9. My dear old mother, women bishops and a Monty Python moment that could sink the C of E (Daily Mail)
    "My fear is that the triumphant, zealous minority in the House of Laity may have hastened the Church of England's transformation from a national institution into an exclusive, unwelcoming sect for the religious", writes Tom Utley
  10. The Palestinians need business – not bombs (Times, £)
    A thriving West Bank and Gaza would have no truck with religious extremists who threaten their prosperity, argues Philip Collins