Leveson day: what happens when?

Your timetable for today.

After eight months of hearings and 474 witnesses, today's the day we get to see the Leveson report. Here's a timetable of the key events.

8am Ed Miliband and his staff received five copies of the 2,000 page report earlier this morning. David Cameron and Nick Clegg were given copies yesterday. In a piece for the Guardian on Monday, Miliband wrote that the government should act on the report's recommendations provided that they are "reasonable and proportionate".

11am The inquiry's "core participants" and selected members of the media will be given access to the report in a secure "lock-in".

1:30pm The report will be published on the inquiry website and Lord Justice Leveson will make a short statement at the QEII Conference Centre in Westminster. He will not take questions and will not give any interviews.

With Leveson due to fly to Australia this weekend to take part in a conference on privacy regulation and to deliver a series of speeches on the future of the media, MPs may not get a chance to question him before Parliament rises on 20 December. The Times (£) reports that Leveson is "unlikely to be available as he is taking a holiday after making the speeches."

3pm Cameron will gave a Commons statement outlining the government's "direction of travel" and Miliband will respond for Labour. This will be folllowed by questions from MPs.

Nick Clegg will then give a separate statement setting out the Liberal Democrat position and Harriet Harman, in her capacity as shadow culture secretary, will respond for Labour.

Clegg said this morning: "I believe in a vigorous free press holding the powerful to account and not subject to political interference. But a free press does not and cannot mean a press that is free to bully innocent people or free to abuse grieving families. I hope when Lord Justice Leveson gives his statement later today, we’ll remember the reasons why this inquiry was set up."

Lord Justice Leveson at the launch of his inquiry into the press earlier this year. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Can Philip Hammond save the Conservatives from public anger at their DUP deal?

The Chancellor has the wriggle room to get close to the DUP's spending increase – but emotion matters more than facts in politics.

The magic money tree exists, and it is growing in Northern Ireland. That’s the attack line that Labour will throw at Theresa May in the wake of her £1bn deal with the DUP to keep her party in office.

It’s worth noting that while £1bn is a big deal in terms of Northern Ireland’s budget – just a touch under £10bn in 2016/17 – as far as the total expenditure of the British government goes, it’s peanuts.

The British government spent £778bn last year – we’re talking about spending an amount of money in Northern Ireland over the course of two years that the NHS loses in pen theft over the course of one in England. To match the increase in relative terms, you’d be looking at a £35bn increase in spending.

But, of course, political arguments are about gut instinct rather than actual numbers. The perception that the streets of Antrim are being paved by gold while the public realm in England, Scotland and Wales falls into disrepair is a real danger to the Conservatives.

But the good news for them is that last year Philip Hammond tweaked his targets to give himself greater headroom in case of a Brexit shock. Now the Tories have experienced a shock of a different kind – a Corbyn shock. That shock was partly due to the Labour leader’s good campaign and May’s bad campaign, but it was also powered by anger at cuts to schools and anger among NHS workers at Jeremy Hunt’s stewardship of the NHS. Conservative MPs have already made it clear to May that the party must not go to the country again while defending cuts to school spending.

Hammond can get to slightly under that £35bn and still stick to his targets. That will mean that the DUP still get to rave about their higher-than-average increase, while avoiding another election in which cuts to schools are front-and-centre. But whether that deprives Labour of their “cuts for you, but not for them” attack line is another question entirely. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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