Leveson day: what happens when?

Your timetable for today.

After eight months of hearings and 474 witnesses, today's the day we get to see the Leveson report. Here's a timetable of the key events.

8am Ed Miliband and his staff received five copies of the 2,000 page report earlier this morning. David Cameron and Nick Clegg were given copies yesterday. In a piece for the Guardian on Monday, Miliband wrote that the government should act on the report's recommendations provided that they are "reasonable and proportionate".

11am The inquiry's "core participants" and selected members of the media will be given access to the report in a secure "lock-in".

1:30pm The report will be published on the inquiry website and Lord Justice Leveson will make a short statement at the QEII Conference Centre in Westminster. He will not take questions and will not give any interviews.

With Leveson due to fly to Australia this weekend to take part in a conference on privacy regulation and to deliver a series of speeches on the future of the media, MPs may not get a chance to question him before Parliament rises on 20 December. The Times (£) reports that Leveson is "unlikely to be available as he is taking a holiday after making the speeches."

3pm Cameron will gave a Commons statement outlining the government's "direction of travel" and Miliband will respond for Labour. This will be folllowed by questions from MPs.

Nick Clegg will then give a separate statement setting out the Liberal Democrat position and Harriet Harman, in her capacity as shadow culture secretary, will respond for Labour.

Clegg said this morning: "I believe in a vigorous free press holding the powerful to account and not subject to political interference. But a free press does not and cannot mean a press that is free to bully innocent people or free to abuse grieving families. I hope when Lord Justice Leveson gives his statement later today, we’ll remember the reasons why this inquiry was set up."

Lord Justice Leveson at the launch of his inquiry into the press earlier this year. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Show Hide image

Michael Gove definitely didn't betray anyone, says Michael Gove

What's a disagreement among friends?

Michael Gove is certainly not a traitor and he thinks Theresa May is absolutely the best leader of the Conservative party.

That's according to the cast out Brexiteer, who told the BBC's World At One life on the back benches has given him the opportunity to reflect on his mistakes. 

He described Boris Johnson, his one-time Leave ally before he decided to run against him for leader, as "phenomenally talented". 

Asked whether he had betrayed Johnson with his surprise leadership bid, Gove protested: "I wouldn't say I stabbed him in the back."

Instead, "while I intially thought Boris was the right person to be Prime Minister", he later came to the conclusion "he wasn't the right person to be Prime Minister at that point".

As for campaigning against the then-PM David Cameron, he declared: "I absolutely reject the idea of betrayal." Instead, it was a "disagreement" among friends: "Disagreement among friends is always painful."

Gove, who up to July had been a government minister since 2010, also found time to praise the person in charge of hiring government ministers, Theresa May. 

He said: "With the benefit of hindsight and the opportunity to spend some time on the backbenches reflecting on some of the mistakes I've made and some of the judgements I've made, I actually think that Theresa is the right leader at the right time. 

"I think that someone who took the position she did during the referendum is very well placed both to unite the party and lead these negotiations effectively."

Gove, who told The Times he was shocked when Cameron resigned after the Brexit vote, had backed Johnson for leader.

However, at the last minute he announced his candidacy, and caused an infuriated Johnson to pull his own campaign. Gove received just 14 per cent of the vote in the final contest, compared to 60.5 per cent for May. 


Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.