Clegg joins Miliband in supporting state-backed press regulation

Cameron is left as the only one of the three main party leaders opposed to statutory underpinning of the new system.

Delivering his own separate Commons statement, Nick Clegg has just joined Ed Miliband in supporting state-backed regulation of the press, the central recommendation of the Leveson report. Clegg argued that changing the law was "the only way to give us all the assurance that the new regulator isn’t just independent for a few months or years, but is independent for good."

The Deputy PM said that he had concerns about the proposed changes to data protection law and the suggestion that Ofcom should independently verify the new press regulator, but otherwise welcomed Leveson's recommendations as "proportionate and workable". He rejected the claim, made by Cameron, that state involvement would blur the line between politicians and the media, arguing that the line had already been blurred under the current system of self-regulation.

Clegg concluded:

We mustn’t now prevaricate. I – like many people – am impatient for reform. And, bluntly, nothing I have seen so far in this debate suggests to me we will find a better solution than the one which has been proposed. Nor do I draw any hope from the repeated failure of pure self-regulation that we’ve seen over the last 60 years.

This leaves Cameron as the only one of the three main party leaders opposed to statutory underpinning of the new regulatory system. Should Ed Miliband succeed in forcing a vote on the Leveson report, there is now a chance that Cameron will be defeated. In addition to most Labour and Liberal Democrat MPs, more than 70 Conservative MPs have publicly declared their support for state-backed regulation.

Nick Clegg said that "changing the law" was only the way to ensure the new press regulator is independent. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Why Ukip might not be dead just yet

Nigel Farage's party might have a second act in it. 

Remember Ukip? Their former leader Nigel Farage is carving out a living as a radio shock jock and part-time film critic. The party is currently midway through a leadership election to replace Paul Nuttall, who quit his post following their disastrous showing at the general election.

They are already facing increasing financial pressure thanks to the loss of short money and, now they no longer have any MPs, their parliamentary office in Westminster, too. There may be bigger blows to come. In March 2019, their 24 MEPs will all lose their posts when Britain leaves the European Union, denying another source of funding. In May 2021, if Ukip’s disastrous showing in the general election is echoed in the Welsh Assembly, the last significant group of full-time Ukip politicians will lose their seats.

To make matters worse, the party could be badly split if Anne-Marie Waters, the founder of Sharia Watch, is elected leader, as many of the party’s MEPs have vowed to quit if she wins or is appointed deputy leader by the expected winner, Peter Whittle.

Yet when you talk to Ukip officials or politicians, they aren’t despairing, yet. 

Because paradoxically, they agree with Remainers: Theresa May’s Brexit deal will disappoint. Any deal including a "divorce bill" – which any deal will include – will fall short of May's rhetoric at the start of negotiations. "People are willing to have a little turbulence," says one senior figure about any economic fallout, "but not if you tell them you haven't. We saw that with Brown and the end of boom and bust. That'll be where the government is in March 2019."

They believe if Ukip can survive as a going concern until March 2019, then they will be well-placed for a revival. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.