Cameron warns child abuse scandal could become a "witch-hunt" against gay people

How the PM responded to being shown a list of three Tories accused of involvement.

David Cameron was visibly unsettled when Phillip Schofield handed him a list of three Conservatives accused of involvement in the child abuse scandal during his appearance on This Morning, and he may come to regret his response. "There is a danger that this could turn into a sort of witch-hunt, particularly against people who are gay," Cameron said.

By suggesting that some on the list "are gay", the Prime Minister has inadvertently encouraged further speculation over their identity. But it is with Schofield, who showed gross irresponsibility by asking Cameron to comment on a list based on internet rumour, that the blame must rest. After warning against a "witch-hunt", Cameron added: "I'm worried about the sort of thing you're doing right now, giving me a list of names that you've taken off the internet".

Earlier this week, Labour MP Susan Elan Jones asked the government to assure her that any member of the House of Lords found guilty of child abuse would be "stripped of their peerage" in what many saw as a deliberate attempt to hint at the identity of one of the alleged abusers. Theresa May has warned MPs that using parliamentary privilege to name those accused of involvement could jeopardise any future trial.

David Cameron made his remarks during an appearance on ITV show This Morning. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.