Boris: Cameron should do "whatever it takes" to hire Lynton Crosby

Mayor of London says the Tories should "push the boat out, break the piggy bank, kill the fatted calf" to secure the services of his campaign manager.

In tomorrow's New Statesman, Boris Johnson adds his voice to those demanding that Lynton Crosby, the hard-nosed Australian political strategist, be installed as the Tories' campaign chief for the 2015 election. He tells Andrew Gimson, who has profiled Crosby for the issue, that the Tories should do "whatever it takes" to secure the services of the man who oversaw his election - and re-election - as Mayor of London. "Push the boat out, break the piggy bank, kill the fatted calf," he says.

Boris describes Crosby as "an absolutely brilliant campaign manager".

"I’ve never known anyone so good at motivating a campaign." He had "a thing called the pink cardigan", and "all these hordes of young people working for him". At the end of each day, he would throw the pink cardigan to someone who had “monstered the Labour Party or done something particularly distinguished".

As Gimson, the author of Boris: The Rise of Boris Johnson, notes, this is a "rare example of Johnson agreeing with something that Cameron and Osborne want to do." He adds: "The appointment would be popular on the Tory back benches, which assume Crosby would treat the Liberal Democrats far more roughly than Cameron has done. In the mayoral elections, he proved expert at harvesting Lib Dem votes for Johnson."

Yet it is precisely these virtues (in the Tories' eyes) that mean Cameron is wary of recruiting Crosby. The appointment of the man behind the Tories' 2005 "Are you thinking what we're thinking?"campaign would be viewed as an act of wilful provocation by the Lib Dems. The fear in Downing Street is that the arrival of "the Wizard of Oz" would threaten the coalition's fragile truce.

Lynton Crosby, who ran Boris Johnson's 2008 and 2012 election campaigns. Sketch: Dan Murrell.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Scotland's vast deficit remains an obstacle to independence

Though the country's financial position has improved, independence would still risk severe austerity. 

For the SNP, the annual Scottish public spending figures bring good and bad news. The good news, such as it is, is that Scotland's deficit fell by £1.3bn in 2016/17. The bad news is that it remains £13.3bn or 8.3 per cent of GDP – three times the UK figure of 2.4 per cent (£46.2bn) and vastly higher than the white paper's worst case scenario of £5.5bn. 

These figures, it's important to note, include Scotland's geographic share of North Sea oil and gas revenue. The "oil bonus" that the SNP once boasted of has withered since the collapse in commodity prices. Though revenue rose from £56m the previous year to £208m, this remains a fraction of the £8bn recorded in 2011/12. Total public sector revenue was £312 per person below the UK average, while expenditure was £1,437 higher. Though the SNP is playing down the figures as "a snapshot", the white paper unambiguously stated: "GERS [Government Expenditure and Revenue Scotland] is the authoritative publication on Scotland’s public finances". 

As before, Nicola Sturgeon has warned of the threat posed by Brexit to the Scottish economy. But the country's black hole means the risks of independence remain immense. As a new state, Scotland would be forced to pay a premium on its debt, resulting in an even greater fiscal gap. Were it to use the pound without permission, with no independent central bank and no lender of last resort, borrowing costs would rise still further. To offset a Greek-style crisis, Scotland would be forced to impose dramatic austerity. 

Sturgeon is undoubtedly right to warn of the risks of Brexit (particularly of the "hard" variety). But for a large number of Scots, this is merely cause to avoid the added turmoil of independence. Though eventual EU membership would benefit Scotland, its UK trade is worth four times as much as that with Europe. 

Of course, for a true nationalist, economics is irrelevant. Independence is a good in itself and sovereignty always trumps prosperity (a point on which Scottish nationalists align with English Brexiteers). But if Scotland is to ever depart the UK, the SNP will need to win over pragmatists, too. In that quest, Scotland's deficit remains a vast obstacle. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.