Boris: Cameron should do "whatever it takes" to hire Lynton Crosby

Mayor of London says the Tories should "push the boat out, break the piggy bank, kill the fatted calf" to secure the services of his campaign manager.

In tomorrow's New Statesman, Boris Johnson adds his voice to those demanding that Lynton Crosby, the hard-nosed Australian political strategist, be installed as the Tories' campaign chief for the 2015 election. He tells Andrew Gimson, who has profiled Crosby for the issue, that the Tories should do "whatever it takes" to secure the services of the man who oversaw his election - and re-election - as Mayor of London. "Push the boat out, break the piggy bank, kill the fatted calf," he says.

Boris describes Crosby as "an absolutely brilliant campaign manager".

"I’ve never known anyone so good at motivating a campaign." He had "a thing called the pink cardigan", and "all these hordes of young people working for him". At the end of each day, he would throw the pink cardigan to someone who had “monstered the Labour Party or done something particularly distinguished".

As Gimson, the author of Boris: The Rise of Boris Johnson, notes, this is a "rare example of Johnson agreeing with something that Cameron and Osborne want to do." He adds: "The appointment would be popular on the Tory back benches, which assume Crosby would treat the Liberal Democrats far more roughly than Cameron has done. In the mayoral elections, he proved expert at harvesting Lib Dem votes for Johnson."

Yet it is precisely these virtues (in the Tories' eyes) that mean Cameron is wary of recruiting Crosby. The appointment of the man behind the Tories' 2005 "Are you thinking what we're thinking?"campaign would be viewed as an act of wilful provocation by the Lib Dems. The fear in Downing Street is that the arrival of "the Wizard of Oz" would threaten the coalition's fragile truce.

Lynton Crosby, who ran Boris Johnson's 2008 and 2012 election campaigns. Sketch: Dan Murrell.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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The Tories have missed a chance to show that they care about student debt

After condemning Jeremy Corbyn for his "betrayal", the government has still raised the top student interest rate to 6.1 per cent. 

For weeks, the Conservatives have assailed Jeremy Corbyn for his alleged betrayal over student debt. The Labour leader told NME during the campaign that he would "deal with" the issue. But he later clarified that this did not amount to a "commitment" to wipe out student debt (which would cost around £100bn) and that he had been "unaware of the size of it at the time". For this, the Tories have accused him of Clegg-style hypocrisy. 

There is little sign, however, that the attack has proved effective. Labour’s manifesto said nothing on the subject of student debt and Corbyn's language in the NME interview was ambiguous. "I’m looking at ways that we could reduce that [student debt], ameliorate that, lengthen the period of paying it off," he said. There is no comparison with the Liberal Democrats, who explicitly vowed not to raise tuition fees before trebling them to £9,000 as part of the coalition. Young voters still credit Corbyn for his vow to abolish tuition fees (were he to break this promise in power, it would be a different matter). 

A further problem for the Tories is that they have spotlighted a problem - student debt - without offering any solution. At present, graduates pay a marginal tax rate of 41 per cent on earnings over £21,000 (20 per cent income tax, 12 per cent national insurance and 9 per cent student loan repayment). This, combined with the average debt (£50,800), leaves them struggling to save for a home deposit, or even to pay the rent. The Conservatives, unsurprisingly, are unable to sell capitalism to voters with no capital. 

Yet rather than remedying this problem, the government has compounded it. The Department of Education has ruled out reducing the top interest rate on student loans from 6.1 per cent, meaning the average student will accrue £5,800 in interest charges even before they graduate.

By maintaining the status quo, the Tories have missed a chance to demonstrate that they have learned from their electoral humbling. Had they reduced student debt, or cut tuition fees, they could have declared that while Corbyn talks, they act. Instead, they have merely confirmed that for graduates who want change, Corbyn remains their best hope. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.