The Bank of England warns Osborne: prepare for a triple-dip recession

Osborne said the economy was "on the right track" but the Bank warns growth could disappear in Q4.

It was always unwise for George Osborne to cite the most recent set of growth figures as proof that "we're on the right track", principally because the good news is unlikely to last. Growth in quarter three, which stood at one per cent, was artificially inflated by the Olympics (which added 0.2 per cent to growth) and by the bounce back from the Jubilee bank holiday (which added 0.5 per cent). There was, as I wrote when the figures were published, a strong chance of a contraction in the fourth quarter.

Now the Bank of England has become the latest forecaster to warn of the possibility of a triple-dip recession. In its quarterly inflation report, it notes that

Headline outturns for GDP in 2012 have been, and will continue to be, volatile, with the data buffeted by one-off influences such as the Jubilee and the Olympics. In Q3, output increased by 1%. In Q4, that growth rate seems set to fall sharply as the boost from the Olympics is reversed; indeed, output may post a small decline [emphasis mine].

Having claimed that the economy is "healing", Osborne will struggle to explain why the patient has taken another turn for the worse.

George Osborne at an EU Economy and Finance Council meeting in Luxembourg. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.