The Bank of England warns Osborne: prepare for a triple-dip recession

Osborne said the economy was "on the right track" but the Bank warns growth could disappear in Q4.

It was always unwise for George Osborne to cite the most recent set of growth figures as proof that "we're on the right track", principally because the good news is unlikely to last. Growth in quarter three, which stood at one per cent, was artificially inflated by the Olympics (which added 0.2 per cent to growth) and by the bounce back from the Jubilee bank holiday (which added 0.5 per cent). There was, as I wrote when the figures were published, a strong chance of a contraction in the fourth quarter.

Now the Bank of England has become the latest forecaster to warn of the possibility of a triple-dip recession. In its quarterly inflation report, it notes that

Headline outturns for GDP in 2012 have been, and will continue to be, volatile, with the data buffeted by one-off influences such as the Jubilee and the Olympics. In Q3, output increased by 1%. In Q4, that growth rate seems set to fall sharply as the boost from the Olympics is reversed; indeed, output may post a small decline [emphasis mine].

Having claimed that the economy is "healing", Osborne will struggle to explain why the patient has taken another turn for the worse.

George Osborne at an EU Economy and Finance Council meeting in Luxembourg. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Jeremy Corbyn appoints Shami Chakrabarti to lead inquiry into Labour and antisemitism

“Labour is an anti-racist party to its core," says leader.

Jeremy Corbyn has announced plans for an independent inquiry into antisemitism in the Labour party.

The review – led by Shami Chakrabarti, the former director of the human rights campaign group Liberty – will consult with the Jewish community and other minority groups, and report back within two months.

Its vice chair will be the director of the Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-semitism, Professor David Feldman.

The move follows a week in which the party suspended Bradford MP Naz Shah and former London mayor Ken Livingstone, amid claims that both had made antisemitic remarks.

But Corbyn told the Guardian: “Labour is an anti-racist party to its core and has a long and proud history of standing against racism, including antisemitism. I have campaigned against racism all my life and the Jewish community has been at the heart of the Labour party and progressive politics in Britain for more than 100 years.”

He added that he would not see the results of next Thursday's local elections as a reflection of his leadership, and insisted that he would not be held to arbitrary measures of success.

“I’m keeping going, I was elected with a very large mandate and I have a huge responsibility to the people who elected me to this position," he said.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of the New Statesman's sister site CityMetric. He is on Twitter, far too much, as @JonnElledge.