How many independent inquiries has Labour called for?

Why Miliband's call for an inquiry into the Jimmy Savile affair felt so familiar.

Just as he argued that Rebekah Brooks could not lead an inquiry into herself, so Ed Miliband has declared that the BBC cannot investigate itself over the Jimmy Savile affair. He told ITV News last night:

To do right by the victims, I don't think the BBC can lead their own inquiry... I think we need a broader look at these public institutions - the BBC, I'm afraid some parts of the NHS, potentially, Broadmoor.

I'm open-minded about how it's done but it's got to be independent ... I'm a great supporter of the BBC but I don't think you can have the BBC board sort of leading its own inquiry.

Labour's default response to scandal is, increasingly, to demand an independent inquiry, so I've compiled a list of some of its most recent calls. Whether or not the below reflects an unusual preponderance of scandals or a lack of imagination on Labour's part, I'll let you decide.

West Coast Mainline

It is vital that we get to the bottom of the role of Ministers and who knew what when. It is scandalous that the review of what has been a huge failure of government is to be conducted by a senior figure from within the Department for Transport. We need a truly independent inquiry led by a figure unconnected to the DfT examining the role of officials from top to bottom, including ministers. There must be no scapegoating.

Maria Eagle, 5 October 2012

GCSE English papers

Whilst the Education Secretary Michael Gove says he is ‘saddened’ by the injustice that has been served to thousands of pupils, he is showing how out-of-touch he is with pupil opinion by refusing to take action. Labour supports calls for an independent inquiry to get to the bottom of this mess.

Stephen Twigg, 7 September 2012

The banks

We've got to have an open, independent inquiry with hearings to find out what is going on in the dark corners of the banks.

Ed Miliband, 30 June 2012

PIP breast implants

These women have had their lives turned upside down by this scandal but have rallied together to, in my view, articulate a convincing case for a public inquiry to take place in Scotland.

Jackie Baillie, 14 June 2012

Cash-for-access

With new allegations of cash for access emerging on a daily basis it is vital that David Cameron comes clean about the full scale and nature of his many meetings with wealthy donors. He needs to establish an independent inquiry immediately so people can have confidence that this matter will be resolved.

Jon Trickett, 1 April 2012

The riots

That is why I do say again to the Prime Minister: You must now agree to this commission of inquiry, you must agree to the national conversation that we need. Only by doing that can we properly serve the victims of what happened.

Ed Miliband, 13 August 2011

Care home abuse

There must be an independent investigation into what happened and what lessons need to be learned and the government should announce it straight away.

Ed Miliband, 7 June 2011

The press (successful)

It is not about government imposing this on the press, but I think the review needs to have some independence, both from government and from those involved in the day-to-day running of newspapers.

Ed Miliband, 19 April 2011

Labour leader Ed Miliband with deputy leader Harriet Harman at the party's conference in Manchester. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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