Hollywood comes out to bat for Obama: video round-up

Sarah Jessica Parker, Lena Dunham, and Lucas Gray have all produced videos in support of the president.

Under two weeks to go until the US election, and the media world is going headfirst into its support of both candidates. But mainly Obama.

Sarah Jessica Parker appeared on Access Hollywood and passionately gave her reasons for supporting Obama (after a detour about her trip to collect Irish groceries which, apparently, are a thing) – and for opposing Romney.

Jezebel, who posted the video, sum up her appearance:

Romney's flip-flopping, almost accidentally shows her home address on National TV because she's JUST LIKE US, acknowledges that she would be better off financially with Romney as president but she's concerned about equality and women's rights, she won't move to Canada if Romney wins because she will not give up on this country, she is all about women voting, WOMEN VOTE DAMMIT OR SHE WILL COME AFTER YOU. . .

SJP for president! OF MY HEART.

Elsewhere, animator Lucas Gray, who has previously worked on the Simpsons and Family Guy, wrote and directed a superb three-minute adaptation of one of Obama's speeches into a film called Why Obama Now. It focuses on attacking the concept of "trickle down" economics, and does a remarkably good job. Plus, it has graphs, but doesn't scare people with them:

Finally, Lena Dunham, writer, director and star of Sky's Girls, has produced a sweetly funny video about her first time (voting), aimed at people in the same situation this year as she was last election:

The president speaks. Image from the video "Why Obama Now"

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty Images
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Autumn Statement 2015: George Osborne abandons his target

How will George Osborne close the deficit after his U-Turns? Answer: he won't, of course. 

“Good governments U-Turn, and U-Turn frequently.” That’s Andrew Adonis’ maxim, and George Osborne borrowed heavily from him today, delivering two big U-Turns, on tax credits and on police funding. There will be no cuts to tax credits or to the police.

The Office for Budget Responsibility estimates that, in total, the government gave away £6.2 billion next year, more than half of which is the reverse to tax credits.

Osborne claims that he will still deliver his planned £12bn reduction in welfare. But, as I’ve written before, without cutting tax credits, it’s difficult to see how you can get £12bn out of the welfare bill. Here’s the OBR’s chart of welfare spending:

The government has already promised to protect child benefit and pension spending – in fact, it actually increased pensioner spending today. So all that’s left is tax credits. If the government is not going to cut them, where’s the £12bn come from?

A bit of clever accounting today got Osborne out of his hole. The Universal Credit, once it comes in in full, will replace tax credits anyway, allowing him to describe his U-Turn as a delay, not a full retreat. But the reality – as the Treasury has admitted privately for some time – is that the Universal Credit will never be wholly implemented. The pilot schemes – one of which, in Hammersmith, I have visited myself – are little more than Potemkin set-ups. Iain Duncan Smith’s Universal Credit will never be rolled out in full. The savings from switching from tax credits to Universal Credit will never materialise.

The £12bn is smaller, too, than it was this time last week. Instead of cutting £12bn from the welfare budget by 2017-8, the government will instead cut £12bn by the end of the parliament – a much smaller task.

That’s not to say that the cuts to departmental spending and welfare will be painless – far from it. Employment Support Allowance – what used to be called incapacity benefit and severe disablement benefit – will be cut down to the level of Jobseekers’ Allowance, while the government will erect further hurdles to claimants. Cuts to departmental spending will mean a further reduction in the numbers of public sector workers.  But it will be some way short of the reductions in welfare spending required to hit Osborne’s deficit reduction timetable.

So, where’s the money coming from? The answer is nowhere. What we'll instead get is five more years of the same: increasing household debt, austerity largely concentrated on the poorest, and yet more borrowing. As the last five years proved, the Conservatives don’t need to close the deficit to be re-elected. In fact, it may be that having the need to “finish the job” as a stick to beat Labour with actually helped the Tories in May. They have neither an economic imperative nor a political one to close the deficit. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.