Hollywood comes out to bat for Obama: video round-up

Sarah Jessica Parker, Lena Dunham, and Lucas Gray have all produced videos in support of the president.

Under two weeks to go until the US election, and the media world is going headfirst into its support of both candidates. But mainly Obama.

Sarah Jessica Parker appeared on Access Hollywood and passionately gave her reasons for supporting Obama (after a detour about her trip to collect Irish groceries which, apparently, are a thing) – and for opposing Romney.

Jezebel, who posted the video, sum up her appearance:

Romney's flip-flopping, almost accidentally shows her home address on National TV because she's JUST LIKE US, acknowledges that she would be better off financially with Romney as president but she's concerned about equality and women's rights, she won't move to Canada if Romney wins because she will not give up on this country, she is all about women voting, WOMEN VOTE DAMMIT OR SHE WILL COME AFTER YOU. . .

SJP for president! OF MY HEART.

Elsewhere, animator Lucas Gray, who has previously worked on the Simpsons and Family Guy, wrote and directed a superb three-minute adaptation of one of Obama's speeches into a film called Why Obama Now. It focuses on attacking the concept of "trickle down" economics, and does a remarkably good job. Plus, it has graphs, but doesn't scare people with them:

Finally, Lena Dunham, writer, director and star of Sky's Girls, has produced a sweetly funny video about her first time (voting), aimed at people in the same situation this year as she was last election:

The president speaks. Image from the video "Why Obama Now"

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Gordon Brown contemplated making Alastair Campbell a minister

The move is revealed in Ed Balls' new book.

Gordon Brown contemplated making Alastair Campbell, a sports minister. Campbell had served as Tony Blair’s press chief from 1994 to 2003, Ed Balls has revealed.

Although the move fell through, Campbell would have been one of a number of high-profile ministerial appointments, usually through the Lords, made by Brown during his tenure at 10 Downing Street.

Other unusual appointments included the so-called “Goats” appointed in 2007, part of what Brown dubbed “the government of all the talents”, in which Ara Darzi, a respected surgeon, Mark Malloch-Brown, formerly a United Nations diplomat,  Alan West, a former admiral, Paul Myners, a  successful businessman, and Digby Jones, former director-general of the CBI, took ministerial posts and seats in the Lords. While Darzi, West and Myners were seen as successes on Whitehall, Jones quit the government after a year and became a vocal critic of both Brown’s successors as Labour leader, Ed Miliband and Jeremy Corbyn.

The story is revealed in Ed Balls’ new book, Speaking Out, a record of his time as a backroom adviser and later Cabinet and shadow cabinet minister until the loss of his seat in May 2015. It is published 6 September.