Cameron's The Thick of It-style energy pledge unravels

Government forced to backtrack on surprise announcement that companies will be forced to offer customers the lowest tariff available.

David Cameron's surprise announcement at yesterday's PMQs that energy companies will be forced to put all their customers on the lowest tariff available was yet another The Thick of It moment from a government that has supplied many. The Department of Energy appeared not to have been briefed on the proposal, with officials struggling to offer any detail on the policy. A spokesman eventually fell back on the line that the coalition was looking "at all options" to help consumers get the lowest tariffs.

For the record, here's what Cameron said yesterday:

I can announce that we will be legislating so that energy companies have to give the lowest tariff to their customers – something that Labour did not do in 13 years, even though the leader of the Labour Party could have done it because he had the job.

This morning, it's no clearer where the government stands. There was, perhaps unsurprisingly, no minister available to discuss the subject in the 8:10am slot on the Today programme. It appears probable that Cameron's pledge was "a slip of the tongue", as a spokesman from USwitch, the energy comparison website, surmised.

After Cameron's words in the Commons, a spokesman for the PM said:

We've asked energy companies to take action themselves and make clear what the lowest available deals are. The point is, in practice this market is not operating for everyone. A small minority of people are actually switching deals, therefore we need to push some of this responsibility on to the energy companies.

But there's some difference between pushing "some of this responsibility" on to the energy companies and compelling them to offer customers the best deal available.

In his conference speech, Ed Miliband memorably asked, "Have you ever seen a more incompetent, hopeless, out of touch, u-turning, pledge-breaking, make it up as you go along, back of the envelope, miserable shower than this Prime Minister and this Government?"

Based on the latest farce, the answer is probably "no".

Update II: In humiliating scenes in the Commons, energy minister John Hayes has just been forced to backtrack on Cameron's pledge. In response to an Urgent Question from Labour, he said the government would "use the energy bill to get people lower tariffs [emphasis mine] and of course there are different options to be discussed in that process." Cameron, by contrast, had promised to force companies to give their customers the "lowest" tariff.

Update: Thankfully, the Speaker, John Bercow, also takes the view that the government should be forced to explain itself. He's granted an Urgent Question on the subject at 10:30am.

David Cameron leaves 10 Downing Street as he heads to the House of Commons. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Angela Rayner - from teenage mum to the woman who could unify Labour

Corbyn-supporting Rayner mentioned Tony Blair in her speech. 

For those at the Labour party conference feeling pessimistic this September, Angela Rayner’s speech on education may be a rare moment of hope. 

Not only did the shadow education secretary capitalise on one of the few issues uniting the party – opposition to grammar schools – and chart a return to left-wing policies, but she did so while paying tribute to the New Labour legacy. 

Rayner grew up on a Stockport council estate, raised by a mother who could not read nor write. She was, she reminded conference, someone who left school a no-hoper. 

"I left school at 16 pregnant and with no qualifications. Some may argue I was not a great role model for young people. The direction of my life was already set.

"But something happened. Labour's Sure Start centres gave me and my friends, and our children, the support we needed to grow and develop."

Rayner has shown complete loyalty to Jeremy Corbyn throughout the summer, taking two briefs in the depopulated shadow cabinet and speaking at his campaign events.

Nevertheless, as someone who practically benefited from Labour’s policies during its time in government, she is unapologetic about its legacy. She even mentioned the unmentionable, declaring: “Tony Blair talked about education, education, education. Theresa May wants segregation, segregation, segregation.”

As for Rayner's policies, a certain amount of realism underpins her rhetoric. She wants to bring back maintenance grants for low-income students, and the Educational Maintenance Allowance for those in further education. 

But she is not just offering a sop to the middle class. A new childcare taskforce will focus on early education, which she describes as “the most effective drivers of social mobility”. 

Rayner pledged to “put as much effort into expanding, technical, vocational education and meaningful apprenticeships, as we did with higher education”. She declared: "The snobbery about vocational education must end."

Tory critics have questioned the ability of a woman who left school at 16 to be an education secretary, Rayner acknowledged. “I may not have a degree - but I have a Masters in real life,” she said. It could have sounded trite, but her speech delivered the goods. Perhaps she will soon earn her PhD in political instincts too.