Maggie's Men: her first cabinet in 1979

LEFT TO RIGHT, STANDING:

Michael Jopling, parliamentary secretary to the Treasury (chief whip), 1979-83, later agriculture secretary

Made a life peer in 1997, and father of BritArt super-dealer Jay Jopling. A grandee: Alan Clark claimed he dismissed Heseltine as a man who "bought all his own furniture".

Norman Fowler, transport secretary 1979-81, later social services secretary and then employment secretary

First minister to resign from the cabinet "to spend more time with my family" in 1990; later returned to spend more time with his colleagues as party chairman. Life peer, 2001; currently chairman of Lords communications committee.

John Biffen, chief secretary to the Treasury 1979-81. Later trade secretary, Lord President of the Council, leader of the House of Commons and Lord Privy Seal

Sacked after 1987 election, Biffen was a much-liked economic dry with a maverick streak. Bernard Ingham once described him as a "semi-detached member of the cabinet". Life peer, died in 2007.

David Howell, energy secretary 1979-81, later transport secretary

Now deputy Tory leader in the Lords, Howell is father-in-law to the shadow chancellor, George Osborne. Credited with having introduced the idea of privatisation in the late 1960s.

Norman St John-Stevas, Leader of the Commons, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, 1979-81

Responsible for creating select committees, but better known for coming up with "the Great She-Elephant" and "the Leaderene". Sacked in 1981. Ran Royal Fine Art Commission and was Master of Emmanuel, Cambridge.

Humphrey Atkins, Northern Ireland secretary 1979-81; later Lord Privy Seal

Affable man who was NI secretary during the IRA hunger strikes, he resigned with Lord Carrington over the 1982 Falklands invasion. Stood down 1987. Life peer; died 1996.

George Younger, Scottish secretary 1979-86, later defence secretary

One of Thatcher's longest-serving cabinet members, he also ran her leadership campaigns in 1989 and 1990. He resigned from parliament in 1992 to become chairman of RBS, becoming a life peer the same year. He died of cancer in 2003.

Michael Heseltine, environment secretary 1979-83; later defence secretary and Major's deputy PM

Millionaire publisher who brandished the Mace at Labour MPs in opposition. "Tarzan" resigned in 1986; his leadership challenge in 1990 led to Thatcher's downfall.

Nicholas Edwards, Welsh secretary 1979-87

In cabinet until he resigned in 1987, when he became a life peer. Has the distinction of being the only Tory Welsh secretary to have sat for a constituency in Wales.

Patrick Jenkin, health and social security secretary 1979-81; later industry secretary, then environment secretary

At Environment, Jenkin had many battles with local councils, whose power was reduced under Thatcher. Made a life peer in 1987; his son Bernard Jenkin is a Tory MP. Both are descended from Fleeming Jenkin, inventor of the cable car.

John Nott, trade secretary 1979-81, then defence secretary

Stormed off Question Time when labelled a "here today, gone tomorrow" politician by the host, Robin Day. Nott stepped down from politics in 1983 and was knighted the same year. He now lives in Cornwall, where he farms.

Mark Carlisle, education and science secretary 1979-81

Sacked from the cabinet in 1981 as one of the "wets", later life peer and judge in the Channel Islands. Clare Short decided to become an MP after working for him as a civil servant and thinking she could do better. Died in 2005.

Angus Maude, paymaster general 1979-81

Outspoken, sacked from shadow cabinet in the 1960s, was an early Thatcher supporter. Father of Francis Maude, junior minister under John Major. Resigned 1983. Life peer; died 1993.

Sir John Hunt, Baron Hunt: cabinet secretary 1973-79

A senior civil servant, Hunt stepped down as cabinet secretary the year Thatcher became PM, and was made a life peer in 1980. Later chairman of the Disasters Emergency Committee. He died in 2008.

LEFT TO RIGHT, SEATED:

Sir Ian Gilmour, Lord Privy Seal 1979-81

Urbane One Nation Tory. A baronet who once owned the Spectator, he had an acrimonious relationship with Thatcher. Was sacked in 1981. Remained on back benches until 1992, opposing policies such as the poll tax. Life peer; died in 2007.

Christopher Soames, Baron Soames: Lord President of the Council 1979-81

Winston Churchill's son-in-law, a vice-president of the European Commission and the last governor of Southern Rhodesia. He died from pancreatitis in 1987.

Sir Keith Joseph, industry secretary 1979-1981, later education secretary

Considered by many to be the driving intellectual force behind Thatcherism, he stepped down from the cabinet in 1986 and retired from parliament at the 1987 election. Died in December 1994.

Peter Carrington, Lord Carrington: foreign and overseas development secretary 1979-82

Last hereditary peer to hold one of the great offices of state. In cabinet under Heath and Douglas-Home. Resigned at the outbreak of the Falklands War, holding himself responsible for the failure to deter the Argentinian invasion. Nato secretary general, 1984-88.

William Whitelaw, home secretary 1979-83; later leader of the House of Lords, Lord President of the Council and deputy prime minister

Initially challenged Thatcher for the Conservative party leadership in 1979, but became famous for his loyalty to her, which she rewarded with the words: "Every prime minister needs a Willie." After the 1983 general election became a viscount, the last commoner to be created a hereditary peer.

Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham: Lord Chancellor 1979-87

Author of The Case for Conservatism in 1947. Theatrical barrister who had hoped to succeed Harold Macmillan as Tory leader in the 1960s. Author of the phrase "elective dictatorship", later much used about Margaret Thatcher, in 1976. He died in 2001.

Sir Geoffrey Howe, chancellor of the Exchequer 1979-83. Later foreign secretary, leader of the Commons, deputy prime minister

So somnolent in appearance and delivery that Denis Healey said being attacked by him was like "being savaged by a dead sheep", Howe was responsible for bold fiscal policies as chancellor. His resignation was followed swiftly by Thatcher's.

Francis Pym, defence secretary 1979-81, then foreign secretary

Leading Tory "wet" who lost his job after warning against over-large Commons majorities. Descended from the Roundhead John Pym, he stood down in 1987. Life peer; died 2008.

James Prior, employment secretary 1979-81; later Northern Ireland secretary

Avuncular figure who angered Thatcher by not being hard enough on the trade unions when employment secretary. Was demoted to NI instead. Stood down in 1987; made a life peer.

Peter Walker, agriculture minister, 1979-83; later energy secretary and Welsh secretary

A close ally of Edward Heath and founder of the Tory Reform Group. As energy secretary, was criticised by Thatcher for a supposed lack of zeal during the 1984-85 miners' strike, but was the only wet to serve in all her cabinets.

Research by Kate Ferguson and David Patrikarakos