UK politics

By Kevin Meagher - 22 Oct 2014

The US Secretary of State has appointed former senator and presidential hopeful, Gary Hart, as his “personal representative” on Northern Ireland. Why?

By Anoosh Chakelian - 22 Oct 2014

A high-resolution photograph of a party adviser holding manifesto proposals reveals the Lib Dems' plans.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 22 Oct 2014

The government’s independent inquiry into alleged historic child abuse cases can’t seem to find a chair who isn’t linked to the establishment.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 21 Oct 2014

David Cameron gives a peerage to Sir Andrew Green of MigrationWatch, which has caused controversy with its use of data, and harsh proposals regarding immigration.

A food package. Artwork by Lottie Stoddart
By James Harrison - 21 Oct 2014

There have always been people in Britain who are hungry, and those who have tried to feed them. Recently, the rise of the Trussell Trust Foodbank Network has brought the issue of hunger and its causes to public attention. What do foodbanks tell us about Britain today?

By Onkar Sahota - 21 Oct 2014

GPs face low morale, extra responsibilities and the largest patient load ever – it’s time for government to let them get back to seeing patients.

Human Rights

Naples.
By New Statesman - 17 Sep 2014

The critics’ verdicts on Ian McEwan’s The Children Act, A N Wilson’s Victoria: A Life and Elena Ferrante’s Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay.

Gazans are suffering, says resident Ghada Al Kord. Photo: Alison Baskerville, CARE
By Ghada Al Kord - 25 Jul 2014

Palestinian Ghada Al Kord tells of the difficulties of navigating a warzone while pregnant and the indignity of being trapped in Gaza. 

By Lucy Fisher - 22 Jul 2014

The number of female genital mutilation survivors in the UK is double the official NHS estimate, according to a new report.

Instead of immediately implementing protective measures to fight female genital mutilation, the government has called for further "consultation". But it's time for action, not more talking.

New face of justice: along with many black South Africans, Pumla Godobo-Madikizela thinks Eugene de Kock should be freed. Photo: Bloomberg
By Eric Abraham - 13 Jun 2014

Ten years ago psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela wrote a book about the encounters she had with Eugene de Kock, head of apartheid South Africa’s death squad, when in Pretoria prison. She thinks he should be pardoned. 

Young women in Somalia take part in a discussion on FGM, February 2014. Photo: Getty
By Reema Patel - 11 Apr 2014

The problem is that many feel they have to pick a side. But we know that cultures are not as fixed and unchanging as powerful advocates within them may like to make out.

Blogs

By Kevin Meagher - 22 Oct 2014

The US Secretary of State has appointed former senator and presidential hopeful, Gary Hart, as his “personal representative” on Northern Ireland. Why?

By Anoosh Chakelian - 22 Oct 2014

A high-resolution photograph of a party adviser holding manifesto proposals reveals the Lib Dems' plans.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 22 Oct 2014

The government’s independent inquiry into alleged historic child abuse cases can’t seem to find a chair who isn’t linked to the establishment.

By Harry Lambert - 21 Oct 2014

In post-referendum Scotland, the SNP are polling around 40 per cent, which could hand them more than a dozen Labour seats.

By Joss Garman - 21 Oct 2014

This week, David Cameron will meet fellow European leaders to try and conclude fraught negotiations over EU strategy on energy and climate change.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 21 Oct 2014

David Cameron gives a peerage to Sir Andrew Green of MigrationWatch, which has caused controversy with its use of data, and harsh proposals regarding immigration.

International politics

Oscar Pistorius in court. Photo: Getty
By New Statesman - 21 Oct 2014

He also receives a three-year suspended sentence for a firearms offence.

Watching and waiting: tanks outside Kobane, where Islamic State forces are ballting Syrian Kurds. Photo: Ibrahim Erikan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
By John Simpson - 19 Oct 2014

The jihadis are fighting on several fronts in two countries – and reports say that demoralised western recruits are increasingly repulsed by the atrocities they have witnessed.

Rainbow nation: Gnarr at the Reykjavik Gay Pride march in 2011. Photo: Helgi Haldorsson
By Kate Mossman - 16 Oct 2014

In 2010, Jón Gnarr became mayor of Reykjavik by accident. Four years later, he’s relieved it’s over.

A woman kneels in a cloud of gas as she protests the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Getty
By David Millward - 15 Oct 2014

Barely a week goes past without a terrible incident, and too often the police officer is white and the other people involved are black.

Fukuyama has taken a series of consistent, uncompromisingly liberal-conservative stances on US foreign policy. Photo: David Levene/Guardian/Observer
By Sophie McBain - 09 Oct 2014

The American political scientist and author once predicted that liberal democracy had won the battle of ideas. Now he says political Islam is not a serious threat to the west and we should not intervene in Iraq.

There is usually a price when bloodlust goes unchecked in distant lands.
By John Bew - 04 Oct 2014

There is usually a price when bloodlust goes unchecked in distant lands.

Environment

Houses not covered by the coalition's Flood Re scheme could become uninsurable. Photo: Getty
By Guy Shrubsole - 12 Aug 2014

New Conservative Environment Secretary Liz Truss ahd her Lib Dem coalition partners need to be clear on how they will better protect Britain from climate change.

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence.
By Bob Ward - 30 Jul 2014

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence. 

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.
By Ed Wallis - 09 Jun 2014

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.

They're wrong: John Oliver prepares to do battle with climate deniers
By Hillary Kelly - 13 May 2014

John Oliver, once of The Daily Show, and America's “Science Guy” Bill Nye show the world how to debate with climate-change deniers. 

More than the floods, it is interventions by politicians.
By Guy Shrubsole - 19 Feb 2014

More than the floods, it is interventions by politicians that have led to a spike in public concern.

By Guy Shrubsole - 14 Jan 2014

To date, the coalition has unforgivably weakened Britain's climate adaptation plans.

Law

The term “revenge porn” implies a level of consent that isn’t present. Photo: Getty
By Lyndon Harris - 15 Oct 2014

In the past, governments have used the creation of new criminal law as a political football to score cheap points in the eyes of the public and press. But in the case of revenge porn, fresh legislation is sorely needed.

A hearing room in the European Court of Human Rights. Photo: Getty Images
By David Banks - 06 Oct 2014

The European Court of Human Rights and the Human Rights Act have both done a huge amount of good for people in the UK.

A puppet of Justice Secretary Chris Grayling during a protest against legal aid cuts in March 2014. Photo: Getty
By Carl Gardner - 03 Oct 2014

The plan for a “British Bill of Rights and Responsibilities” isn’t as significant as it sounds, says Carl Gardner.

To put it bluntly, I am not South Park’s Timmy or Ricky Gervais’ Derek. Photo: Steve Johnson on Flickr via Creative Commons
By Alex Taylor - 26 Sep 2014

A court can only deter and punish, not challenge prevailing mindsets.

Members of the ANC Women’s League protest outside the court in Pretoria. Photo: Getty
By Sarah Ditum - 12 Sep 2014

The South African athlete has been found guilty of culpable homicide, not murder, following the death of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. In a world where men kill women and not the other way around, that means justice must bend to the male version of events.

Oscar Pistorius arriving at court. Photo: Getty
By New Statesman - 12 Sep 2014

The South African athlete has been cleared of premeditated and second-degree murder.