UK politics

By Tristram Hunt - 03 Mar 2015

 8,000 children on free school meals make the top grades at primary school but just 900 will end up at Britain's top universities. That has to change.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 03 Mar 2015

In the event of a hung parliament, the former First Minister is likely to be the SNP MP to do the deals.

Chuka Umunna and Roberto Mangabeira Unger set out a five point plan to overcome the constraint low productivity imposes on national prosperity.

By Angela Eagle - 03 Mar 2015

British democracy faces a challenge: change or die

By Ashley Cowburn - 03 Mar 2015

The codebreaker, Alan Turing, received a posthumous royal pardon in December 2013. But now his relatives are campaigning for the pardon to be extended to all gay men convicted under gross indecency laws.

Human Rights

Rohingya children play by a relief tent at Bawdupah's Internally Displaced People camp on the outskirts of Sittwe. Photo: Soe Than Win/AFP/Getty Images
By Oliver Griffin - 06 Feb 2015

The status of Burma’s Rohingya people has devolved to the point where even naming them has become controversial. We need to do more.

US Military Police guard detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Photo: Petty Officer 1st class Shane T. McCoy/U.S. Navy/Getty Image
By David Rose - 05 Feb 2015

Detainee Mohamedou Ould Slahi's account of the camp is heartbreaking. But it is crucial the truth is told.

Amnesty International activists protesting the flogging of Raif Badawi outside the Saudi Arabian embassy in Berlin. Photo: Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images
By Diana Garrisi - 03 Feb 2015

Thanks to Saudi Arabia’s brutal and inhumane treatment of blogger Raif Badawi, flogging as a punishment is back in the news. In 19th century Britain, the case of a young soldier who died after a similar assault provoked a national outcry.

London activists march in 2014. Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
By John Simpson - 22 Jan 2015

Boko Haram now controls more towns in Nigeria and an election is drawing near.

Win, lose or draw: the Iranian cartoonist Mana Neyestani was jailed in 2006
By Anoosh Chakelian - 15 Jan 2015

The experience of cartoonists like Ali Ferzat, whose hands were broken in 2011, provides a bleak backdrop to the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

The Home Office has renewed Serco's contract to run the Yarl's Wood detention centre. Photo: Getty Images
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 27 Nov 2014

The detention centre in Buckinghamshire, where 400 women await deportation, has been dogged by allegations of mistreatment - so why has the company which has run it for the last seven years been awarded a new contract?

Blogs

By Tristram Hunt - 03 Mar 2015

 8,000 children on free school meals make the top grades at primary school but just 900 will end up at Britain's top universities. That has to change.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 03 Mar 2015

In the event of a hung parliament, the former First Minister is likely to be the SNP MP to do the deals.

Chuka Umunna and Roberto Mangabeira Unger set out a five point plan to overcome the constraint low productivity imposes on national prosperity.

By Angela Eagle - 03 Mar 2015

British democracy faces a challenge: change or die

By Ashley Cowburn - 03 Mar 2015

The codebreaker, Alan Turing, received a posthumous royal pardon in December 2013. But now his relatives are campaigning for the pardon to be extended to all gay men convicted under gross indecency laws.

International politics

The 1992 liberalisation of the airline market allowed carriers to offer cheaper flights. Photo: Alexander Klein/AFP/Getty Images
By Frances Robinson - 03 Mar 2015

Thanks to the EU, wine is more affordable, flights are cheaper and you can access the internet on your phone abroad without having to get another mortgage. And that’s not all. . .

Manuela Schwesig. Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
By Stephanie Boland - 02 Mar 2015

The new legislation would allow women to compare their salary to their colleagues, and is designed to address Germany's 22 per cent pay gap.

By Stephen Bush - 02 Mar 2015

International development has become the subject of cosy consensus. A new pamphlet aims to put that right

By Beth Miller - 02 Mar 2015

Shorn of its government funding and now reliant on the licence fee, the BBC World Service is in grave danger. Britain could pay a heavy price for letting it go extinct

Child soldiers in South Sudan at a Unicef ceremony of disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration. Photo: Charles Lomodong/AFP/Getty
By Oliver Griffin - 27 Feb 2015

While the UK still has a military recruitment age of 16, it’s hard to see how effective they can be in helping other countries relinquish the practice.

Vladimir Putin at the 2011 International Aviation and Space Show in Zhukovsky, outside Moscow. Photo: Dmitry Kostyukov/AFP/Getty Images
By Jana Bakunina - 26 Feb 2015

I grew up in a family of Soviet intelligentsia, but the relentless propaganda from Russia’s state-controlled media has convinced my father that I am not a patriot. I am a disappointment.

Environment

Stacked peat turf in Connemara. Photo: Tim Graham/Rex
By John Burnside - 27 Jan 2015

94 percent of our peat bogs have been destroyed. Saving them is a vital step in securing our planet's future.

Growing appeal: the Green Party's only MP, Caroline Lucas. Photo: David Levene/Eyevine
By Tim Wigmore - 06 Nov 2014

In 2010, there was little to suggest that Ukip would comprehensively surpass the Greens. While Lucas won the seat of Brighton Pavilion, Nigel Farage came in third when he tried to oust John Bercow in Buckingham.

Houses not covered by the coalition's Flood Re scheme could become uninsurable. Photo: Getty
By Guy Shrubsole - 12 Aug 2014

New Conservative Environment Secretary Liz Truss ahd her Lib Dem coalition partners need to be clear on how they will better protect Britain from climate change.

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence.
By Bob Ward - 30 Jul 2014

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence. 

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.
By Ed Wallis - 09 Jun 2014

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.

They're wrong: John Oliver prepares to do battle with climate deniers
By Hillary Kelly - 13 May 2014

John Oliver, once of The Daily Show, and America's “Science Guy” Bill Nye show the world how to debate with climate-change deniers. 

Law

A portion of the first ever printed copy of the Magna Carta. Photo: British Library
By Anthony Barnett - 26 Feb 2015

A protest march against the Global Law Summit reminds us that the charter is still relevant today.

Surprisingly, “Be Aware B4 You Share” is targeted at the perpetrators of revenge porn. Photo: Getty
By Eleanor Margolis - 13 Feb 2015

Finally, some culprit-blaming as the Ministry of Justice takes an important step forward with the “Be Aware B4 You Share” campaign.

By Aisha Gill - 06 Feb 2015

It is changing attitudes to FGM, rather than high profile trials, that will finally bring the practice to an end.

A branch of Paradise brothel in Spain. Photo: Getty
By Sarah Ditum - 05 Feb 2015

The Liberal Democrats and Greens both support the decriminalisation of prostitution - in the hope of making it "safe". But Germany legalised it in 2002 and it still isn't "a job like any other". 

The atrium at HMP Pentonville in London. Photo: Ian Waldie/Getty
By Andrew Katzen - 27 Jan 2015

Thanks to our ageing population and the surge in harsher sentences, British prisons are slowly turning into dysfunctional nursing homes.

It has been pointed out that Justice Secretary Chris Grayling is quite often the defendant in judicial review proceedings. Photo: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 09 Dec 2014

Judicial review is the mechanism by which citizens can hold the government to its own laws. With the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, the justice secretary is trying to put it out of reach.