UK politics

By Lucy Fisher - 31 Jul 2014

Has the government's series of changes to European rules been too slow, and too limited, to convince the public that Britain should remain in the EU?

The party cannot promise to eliminate the deficit, avoid further tax rises and cut taxes at the same time.
By George Eaton - 31 Jul 2014

The party cannot promise to eliminate the deficit, avoid further tax rises and cut taxes at the same time. 

Far from obsessing over kilts, ceilidhs and pipers, nationalists today are pragmatic.
By Jamie Maxwell - 31 Jul 2014

The mainstream nationalists' arguments for independence are broadly civic and pragmatic, it is the unionists who obsess about the threat an independent Scotland presents to "Britishness".

Shadow childcare minister Lucy Powell, who previously served as Ed Miliband's deputy chief of staff.
By George Eaton - 30 Jul 2014

Lucy Powell and Luciana Berger tipped for promotion. 

Two Britains: a gulf separates the poor from the "squeezed but safe". Photo: Phil Noble/Reuters
By Tom Clark - 30 Jul 2014

In contrast to previous recessions, after Lehman Brothers crashed the belief that excessive benefits bred indolence spread. This view was endorsed by 61 per cent by 2009. 

Human Rights

Gazans are suffering, says resident Ghada Al Kord. Photo: Alison Baskerville, CARE
By Ghada Al Kord - 25 Jul 2014

Palestinian Ghada Al Kord tells of the difficulties of navigating a warzone while pregnant and the indignity of being trapped in Gaza. 

By Lucy Fisher - 22 Jul 2014

The number of female genital mutilation survivors in the UK is double the official NHS estimate, according to a new report.

Instead of immediately implementing protective measures to fight female genital mutilation, the government has called for further "consultation". But it's time for action, not more talking.

New face of justice: along with many black South Africans, Pumla Godobo-Madikizela thinks Eugene de Kock should be freed. Photo: Bloomberg
By Eric Abraham - 13 Jun 2014

Ten years ago psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela wrote a book about the encounters she had with Eugene de Kock, head of apartheid South Africa’s death squad, when in Pretoria prison. She thinks he should be pardoned. 

Young women in Somalia take part in a discussion on FGM, February 2014. Photo: Getty
By Reema Patel - 11 Apr 2014

The problem is that many feel they have to pick a side. But we know that cultures are not as fixed and unchanging as powerful advocates within them may like to make out.

Roma children arrive by bus in Romania after being sent back by French authorities in 2011. Photo: Getty Images
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 Apr 2014

In France, 20,000 Roma live in extreme poverty with little or no access to basic services and face a constant risk of forced evictions.

Blogs

By Lucy Fisher - 31 Jul 2014

Has the government's series of changes to European rules been too slow, and too limited, to convince the public that Britain should remain in the EU?

A mourner grieves for her relative, missing and presumed dead, at the scene of the April 24 Rana Plaza garment building collapse.

The campaign to aid victims hit by the collapse of the Rana Plaza clothing factory last year has produced results, but decent working conditions for all is still a long way off.

The party cannot promise to eliminate the deficit, avoid further tax rises and cut taxes at the same time.
By George Eaton - 31 Jul 2014

The party cannot promise to eliminate the deficit, avoid further tax rises and cut taxes at the same time. 

Far from obsessing over kilts, ceilidhs and pipers, nationalists today are pragmatic.
By Jamie Maxwell - 31 Jul 2014

The mainstream nationalists' arguments for independence are broadly civic and pragmatic, it is the unionists who obsess about the threat an independent Scotland presents to "Britishness".

The recovery may be feeble, but voters are rewarding the Tories as GDP rises – and the 'cost-of-living' is half the issue it was in 2011.

Shadow childcare minister Lucy Powell, who previously served as Ed Miliband's deputy chief of staff.
By George Eaton - 30 Jul 2014

Lucy Powell and Luciana Berger tipped for promotion. 

International politics

Hong Kong's citizens remain determined to achieve democratic values for their city. Photo: Anthony Kwan/Stringer/Getty Images
By Robert Macquarie - 31 Jul 2014

Chinese pressure on the city's government is pushing the situation into dangerous territory.

Global grief: flowers at Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam in memory of the victims of flight MH17, 31 July. Photo: Getty
By David Patrikarakos - 31 Jul 2014

The downing of Flight MH17 in eastern Ukraine’s Donetsk region, was the deadliest aviation incident since the terrorist attacks of 9/11.

Hope fades: Rachel Daniel shows a picture of her daughter Rose, 17, one of the kidnapped girls. Photo: Joe Penney/Reuters
By John Simpson - 31 Jul 2014

President Goodluck Jonathan has no strategy for dealing with Boko Haram – he just hopes the world will forget the 276 youngsters kidnapped by them in April.

A picture taken from the Israeli border shows the sun setting over the Gaza strip. Photo: Getty
By Prof Alan Johnson - 30 Jul 2014

Alan Johnson responds to the NS editor’s article about Israel, Gaza and the left.

Miami-Dade county election officials check voting machines for accuracy. Photo: Getty
By David Millward - 29 Jul 2014

The Florida county – pivotal in the 2000 Bush-Gore battle – has backtracked on a policy that would have meant polling stations didn’t have disabled toilets.

Life in ruins: a man walks in the rubble of the Shejaiya residential district of Gaza City, July 28. Photo: Getty
By Jason Cowley - 28 Jul 2014

It shouldn’t be a question of either you support Israel, no matter what it does, or you are on the side of the Islamists. 

Environment

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence.
By Bob Ward - 30 Jul 2014

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence. 

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.
By Ed Wallis - 09 Jun 2014

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.

They're wrong: John Oliver prepares to do battle with climate deniers
By Hillary Kelly - 13 May 2014

John Oliver, once of The Daily Show, and America's “Science Guy” Bill Nye show the world how to debate with climate-change deniers. 

More than the floods, it is interventions by politicians.
By Guy Shrubsole - 19 Feb 2014

More than the floods, it is interventions by politicians that have led to a spike in public concern.

By Guy Shrubsole - 14 Jan 2014

To date, the coalition has unforgivably weakened Britain's climate adaptation plans.

Texas.
By Naomi Klein - 29 Oct 2013

Is our relentless quest for economic growth killing the planet? Climate scientists have seen the data – and they are coming to some incendiary conclusions.

Law

A memorial to French victims of domestic violence. Photo: Getty
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 23 Jul 2014

An investigation into the murder of Natalie Esack by her estranged husband reveals it followed a campaign of terror waged by a man who could not countenance finally losing control over his victim. But police and prosecutors can only respond to individuals threats and acts of violence. It's time for a change in the law.

Cartoon by Ralph Steadman
By Peter Jukes - 17 Jul 2014

Peter Jukes watched the former tabloid editor’s extraordinary composure in court on every day of the hacking trial. Her story tells you everything you need to know about the way power works.

Crossbench peer and former paralympic athlete Tanni Grey-Thompson. Photo: Getty
By Frances Ryan - 15 Jul 2014

The crossbench peer talks to Frances Ryan about the debate surrounding the UK’s first piece of legislation to address the right-to-die, and her concerns that it will put pressure on vulnerable people to “take the next step”.

CCTV is everywhere in Britain, but it isn't as effective as we think. Photo: Getty
By Emma Woollacott - 07 Jul 2014

In the UK, we already have one of the most closely watched societies in the world, and yet our current CCTV arrangements aren’t nearly as effective at fighting crime as we think. What comes next?

Rebekah Brooks arriving at the Old Bailey in May 2014. Photo: Getty
By Carl Gardner - 25 Jun 2014

The gap between accusation and guilt is not a bug in our criminal justice: it’s a necessary and desirable feature.

A woman holds a banner as she takes part in a "slut walk" in London in 2012. Photo: Getty
By Willard Foxton - 24 Jun 2014

From 1976 until 1988, both sides in sexual cases had anonymity. The Thatcher government – not generally known for its strong stand on women’s rights – repealed it, because it had appalling consequences.