UK politics

By Anoosh Chakelian - 20 Aug 2014

The Home Secretary is consulting on creating a new crime of domestic abuse.

By Chris Sherwood - 20 Aug 2014

The current provision of relationship and sex education in schools isn’t adequate for many young people.

By Caroline Crampton - 20 Aug 2014

Austin Mitchell, who is stepping down as Labour MP for Great Grimsby at the next election, fails to defend his assertion that having more women in Parliament is a “worrying matter”.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 20 Aug 2014

Philip Hammond says the UK is “very much aware” of Brits becoming involved in the Islamic State militant group.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 20 Aug 2014

The peer who the Lib Dems suspended after sexual harassment allegations has had his party membership reinstated.

By Andrew Lomas - 19 Aug 2014

Andrew Lomas is new to the borough of Kensington and Chelsea as a Labour councillor. Here are his first impressions of canvassing in one of London's wealthiest areas.

Human Rights

Gazans are suffering, says resident Ghada Al Kord. Photo: Alison Baskerville, CARE
By Ghada Al Kord - 25 Jul 2014

Palestinian Ghada Al Kord tells of the difficulties of navigating a warzone while pregnant and the indignity of being trapped in Gaza. 

By Lucy Fisher - 22 Jul 2014

The number of female genital mutilation survivors in the UK is double the official NHS estimate, according to a new report.

Instead of immediately implementing protective measures to fight female genital mutilation, the government has called for further "consultation". But it's time for action, not more talking.

New face of justice: along with many black South Africans, Pumla Godobo-Madikizela thinks Eugene de Kock should be freed. Photo: Bloomberg
By Eric Abraham - 13 Jun 2014

Ten years ago psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela wrote a book about the encounters she had with Eugene de Kock, head of apartheid South Africa’s death squad, when in Pretoria prison. She thinks he should be pardoned. 

Young women in Somalia take part in a discussion on FGM, February 2014. Photo: Getty
By Reema Patel - 11 Apr 2014

The problem is that many feel they have to pick a side. But we know that cultures are not as fixed and unchanging as powerful advocates within them may like to make out.

Roma children arrive by bus in Romania after being sent back by French authorities in 2011. Photo: Getty Images
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 Apr 2014

In France, 20,000 Roma live in extreme poverty with little or no access to basic services and face a constant risk of forced evictions.

Blogs

By Anoosh Chakelian - 20 Aug 2014

The Home Secretary is consulting on creating a new crime of domestic abuse.

By New Statesman - 20 Aug 2014

A first look at this week's cover.

By Chris Sherwood - 20 Aug 2014

The current provision of relationship and sex education in schools isn’t adequate for many young people.

By Caroline Crampton - 20 Aug 2014

Austin Mitchell, who is stepping down as Labour MP for Great Grimsby at the next election, fails to defend his assertion that having more women in Parliament is a “worrying matter”.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 20 Aug 2014

Philip Hammond says the UK is “very much aware” of Brits becoming involved in the Islamic State militant group.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 20 Aug 2014

The peer who the Lib Dems suspended after sexual harassment allegations has had his party membership reinstated.

International politics

Bill Clinton at a rally in 1996, the year he declared that “The era of big government is over”. Photo: Getty
By George Eaton - 18 Aug 2014

The authors argue that the west has no choice but to unfurl the banner of revolution again. The fiscal crisis and demographic changes have left treasuries creaking under the weight of debt. 

Faisal II of Iraq, aged 18, taking his oath of office before parliament in 1953. Photo: AFP/Getty Images
By James Dawson - 15 Aug 2014

When was the most stable time in recent Iraqi history? Most likely it was during the British-sponsored Hashemite Kingdom of Iraq from 1921 to 1958.

Many Iraqis fled from Mosul when Isis swept in, but why have some supported the group?
By Lucy Fisher - 15 Aug 2014

Attempts to understand the success of Isis in Iraq would benefit from Marxist analysis, since social and economic factors are the key to explaining Sunni Arab support for, and complicity with, the group.

Displaced Iraqi families from the Yazidi community cross the Iraqi-Syrian border, 13 August. Photo: Getty
By New Statesman - 14 Aug 2014

The UK government has been right to contribute humanitarian aid and to refuse to rule out military involvement if the situation deteriorates.

Taking the phrase “war on crime” rather too literally. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images
By Robert Macquarie - 14 Aug 2014

Over the past few decades, US police departments have invested heavily in military-style equipment and training. The turmoil in Ferguson, Missouri shows the results.

A demonstrator runs for cover in Ferguson, Missouri as police fire tear gas. Photo: Getty
By Garrett Albert Duncan - 14 Aug 2014

A core American cultural value that gives priority to property rights over human rights informs the indifference towards the lives of especially young black men and women.

Environment

Houses not covered by the coalition's Flood Re scheme could become uninsurable. Photo: Getty
By Guy Shrubsole - 12 Aug 2014

New Conservative Environment Secretary Liz Truss ahd her Lib Dem coalition partners need to be clear on how they will better protect Britain from climate change.

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence.
By Bob Ward - 30 Jul 2014

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence. 

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.
By Ed Wallis - 09 Jun 2014

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.

They're wrong: John Oliver prepares to do battle with climate deniers
By Hillary Kelly - 13 May 2014

John Oliver, once of The Daily Show, and America's “Science Guy” Bill Nye show the world how to debate with climate-change deniers. 

More than the floods, it is interventions by politicians.
By Guy Shrubsole - 19 Feb 2014

More than the floods, it is interventions by politicians that have led to a spike in public concern.

By Guy Shrubsole - 14 Jan 2014

To date, the coalition has unforgivably weakened Britain's climate adaptation plans.

Law

A memorial to French victims of domestic violence. Photo: Getty
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 23 Jul 2014

An investigation into the murder of Natalie Esack by her estranged husband reveals it followed a campaign of terror waged by a man who could not countenance finally losing control over his victim. But police and prosecutors can only respond to individuals threats and acts of violence. It's time for a change in the law.

Cartoon by Ralph Steadman
By Peter Jukes - 17 Jul 2014

Peter Jukes watched the former tabloid editor’s extraordinary composure in court on every day of the hacking trial. Her story tells you everything you need to know about the way power works.

Crossbench peer and former paralympic athlete Tanni Grey-Thompson. Photo: Getty
By Frances Ryan - 15 Jul 2014

The crossbench peer talks to Frances Ryan about the debate surrounding the UK’s first piece of legislation to address the right-to-die, and her concerns that it will put pressure on vulnerable people to “take the next step”.

CCTV is everywhere in Britain, but it isn't as effective as we think. Photo: Getty
By Emma Woollacott - 07 Jul 2014

In the UK, we already have one of the most closely watched societies in the world, and yet our current CCTV arrangements aren’t nearly as effective at fighting crime as we think. What comes next?

Rebekah Brooks arriving at the Old Bailey in May 2014. Photo: Getty
By Carl Gardner - 25 Jun 2014

The gap between accusation and guilt is not a bug in our criminal justice: it’s a necessary and desirable feature.

A woman holds a banner as she takes part in a "slut walk" in London in 2012. Photo: Getty
By Willard Foxton - 24 Jun 2014

From 1976 until 1988, both sides in sexual cases had anonymity. The Thatcher government – not generally known for its strong stand on women’s rights – repealed it, because it had appalling consequences.