UK politics

The Arctic Monkeys sing of working class life, but avoided tax on their wealth through the Liberty scheme.
By Luke Nightingale - 23 Jul 2014

We expect corporations to dodge their civic responsibilities, but musicians are meant to speak for everyman. They leave Main St. when they try to avoid tax on their millions.

The Labour MP on what he has learned by leaving the party's front bench.
By George Eaton - 23 Jul 2014

The Labour MP on what he has learned by leaving the party's front bench.

Labour MP criticises those who "use the cover of anonymity to make attacks on a leader".
By George Eaton - 23 Jul 2014

Labour MP criticises those who "use the cover of anonymity to make attacks on a leader". 

Israeli soldiers at the border with Gaza today
By Andrew Smith - 23 Jul 2014

Andrew Smith from the Campaign Against Arms Trade argues that those who oppose Israel's actions in Gaza must acknowledge that Britain is implicitly supporting them through its military trade. 

By Marc Kidson - 23 Jul 2014

The Institute for Government’s new case study on implementing the London Challenge should show new Education Secretary Nicky Morgan how to build an empowering relationship with teachers.

By Anoosh Chakelian - 23 Jul 2014

The Commonwealth Games will open in Glasgow today, and Alex Salmond has promised not to use them for political purposes. Will he keep his word?

Human Rights

By Lucy Fisher - 22 Jul 2014

The number of female genital mutilation survivors in the UK is double the official NHS estimate, according to a new report.

Instead of immediately implementing protective measures to fight female genital mutilation, the government has called for further "consultation". But it's time for action, not more talking.

New face of justice: along with many black South Africans, Pumla Godobo-Madikizela thinks Eugene de Kock should be freed. Photo: Bloomberg
By Eric Abraham - 13 Jun 2014

Ten years ago psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela wrote a book about the encounters she had with Eugene de Kock, head of apartheid South Africa’s death squad, when in Pretoria prison. She thinks he should be pardoned. 

Young women in Somalia take part in a discussion on FGM, February 2014. Photo: Getty
By Reema Patel - 11 Apr 2014

The problem is that many feel they have to pick a side. But we know that cultures are not as fixed and unchanging as powerful advocates within them may like to make out.

Roma children arrive by bus in Romania after being sent back by French authorities in 2011. Photo: Getty Images
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 Apr 2014

In France, 20,000 Roma live in extreme poverty with little or no access to basic services and face a constant risk of forced evictions.

Yarl's Wood Immigration Centre.
By Ashley Cowburn - 09 Apr 2014

Anne Nassozi, who is currently detained in the Yarl's Wood Immigration Centre, will be deported to Uganda this evening despite the country's anti-gay legislation.

Blogs

The Arctic Monkeys sing of working class life, but avoided tax on their wealth through the Liberty scheme.
By Luke Nightingale - 23 Jul 2014

We expect corporations to dodge their civic responsibilities, but musicians are meant to speak for everyman. They leave Main St. when they try to avoid tax on their millions.

Labour MP criticises those who "use the cover of anonymity to make attacks on a leader".
By George Eaton - 23 Jul 2014

Labour MP criticises those who "use the cover of anonymity to make attacks on a leader". 

By Harry Lambert - 23 Jul 2014

Last Thursday's MH17 crash has changed perceptions of the Russian-Ukrainian conflict. Most voters now think the issue is a matter for the West, and support three specific policies.

Israeli soldiers at the border with Gaza today
By Andrew Smith - 23 Jul 2014

Andrew Smith from the Campaign Against Arms Trade argues that those who oppose Israel's actions in Gaza must acknowledge that Britain is implicitly supporting them through its military trade. 

By New Statesman - 23 Jul 2014

A first look at this week’s cover.

By Marc Kidson - 23 Jul 2014

The Institute for Government’s new case study on implementing the London Challenge should show new Education Secretary Nicky Morgan how to build an empowering relationship with teachers.

International politics

What future? A medic helps a man in the wreckage of Shejaia, Gaza. Photo: Reuters
By Uri Dromi - 22 Jul 2014

The Israeli economist Yaacov Sheinin proposes a bold economic answer to the rockets – but with the repressive Hamas in charge, would it have any chance of materialising?

Pro-Russia rebels driving a tank through Donetsk today as international tensions increase over access to the MH17 crash site.
By Lucy Fisher - 21 Jul 2014

The Prime Minister warned President Putin to stop aiding separatists in Ukraine, as responsibility for the MH17 crash was laid at Russia's feet.

John Kerry.
By Ben Birnbaum and Amir Tibon - 21 Jul 2014

Extensive, behind-the-scenes reporting on the Israel-Palestine peace deal that almost was.

Philip Hammond, the newly appointed Foreign Secretary. Photo: Getty
By John Bew - 17 Jul 2014

Philip Hammond's appointment as Foreign Secretary is a triumph for capable functionaries and Little Englanders.

Destroyed: ruins of the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan, blown up by the Taliban in 2001. Photo: Salim Saheb Ettaba/AFP/Getty
By Darius Guppy - 17 Jul 2014

Iran does has grave problems but family life is of a quality that has largely disappeared in the west and privacy is respected. Nor is there any sense of the oppression one finds in Wahhabi societies.

Palestinian firefighters survey the scene of a house destroyed during an Israeli strike. Photo: Getty
By Mehdi Hasan - 16 Jul 2014

The assault on Gaza has been a humanitarian disaster, yet the west's staunch support for Israel continues.

Environment

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.
By Ed Wallis - 09 Jun 2014

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.

They're wrong: John Oliver prepares to do battle with climate deniers
By Hillary Kelly - 13 May 2014

John Oliver, once of The Daily Show, and America's “Science Guy” Bill Nye show the world how to debate with climate-change deniers. 

More than the floods, it is interventions by politicians.
By Guy Shrubsole - 19 Feb 2014

More than the floods, it is interventions by politicians that have led to a spike in public concern.

By Guy Shrubsole - 14 Jan 2014

To date, the coalition has unforgivably weakened Britain's climate adaptation plans.

Texas.
By Naomi Klein - 29 Oct 2013

Is our relentless quest for economic growth killing the planet? Climate scientists have seen the data – and they are coming to some incendiary conclusions.

By Natalie Bennett - 27 Sep 2013

The IPCC report has given the government a wake-up call.

Law

A memorial to French victims of domestic violence. Photo: Getty
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 23 Jul 2014

An investigation into the murder of Natalie Esack by her estranged husband reveals it followed a campaign of terror waged by a man who could not countenance finally losing control over his victim. But police and prosecutors can only respond to individuals threats and acts of violence. It's time for a change in the law.

Cartoon by Ralph Steadman
By Peter Jukes - 17 Jul 2014

Peter Jukes watched the former tabloid editor’s extraordinary composure in court on every day of the hacking trial. Her story tells you everything you need to know about the way power works.

Crossbench peer and former paralympic athlete Tanni Grey-Thompson. Photo: Getty
By Frances Ryan - 15 Jul 2014

The crossbench peer talks to Frances Ryan about the debate surrounding the UK’s first piece of legislation to address the right-to-die, and her concerns that it will put pressure on vulnerable people to “take the next step”.

CCTV is everywhere in Britain, but it isn't as effective as we think. Photo: Getty
By Emma Woollacott - 07 Jul 2014

In the UK, we already have one of the most closely watched societies in the world, and yet our current CCTV arrangements aren’t nearly as effective at fighting crime as we think. What comes next?

Rebekah Brooks arriving at the Old Bailey in May 2014. Photo: Getty
By Carl Gardner - 25 Jun 2014

The gap between accusation and guilt is not a bug in our criminal justice: it’s a necessary and desirable feature.

A woman holds a banner as she takes part in a "slut walk" in London in 2012. Photo: Getty
By Willard Foxton - 24 Jun 2014

From 1976 until 1988, both sides in sexual cases had anonymity. The Thatcher government – not generally known for its strong stand on women’s rights – repealed it, because it had appalling consequences.