UK politics

The Conservatives are right to deny the toxic suggestion that they would shack up with Farage.
By George Eaton - 30 Jan 2015

The Conservatives are right to deny the toxic suggestion that they would shack up with Farage. 

The migrant vote is driving the Conservatives' poor performance in London.
By Tim Wigmore - 30 Jan 2015

The migrant vote is driving the Conservatives' poor performance in London.

Shadow Northern Ireland secretary says former New Labour ministers "would have been the very people lecturing others".
By George Eaton - 30 Jan 2015

Shadow Northern Ireland secretary says former New Labour ministers "would have been the very people lecturing others". 

By Tom Humberstone - 30 Jan 2015

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Real wages for 22-29 year olds down 9 per cent on 2008 Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty
By Ashley Cowburn - 30 Jan 2015

Nearly all groups have seen a decline in real wages since the financial crash of 2008 but losses have not been spread out equally. 

By Tim Wigmore - 29 Jan 2015

Because of the new system, there is a risk that students will turn up to vote on 7 May, but won't be registered.

Human Rights

London activists march in 2014. Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
By John Simpson - 22 Jan 2015

Boko Haram now controls more towns in Nigeria and an election is drawing near.

Win, lose or draw: the Iranian cartoonist Mana Neyestani was jailed in 2006
By Anoosh Chakelian - 15 Jan 2015

The experience of cartoonists like Ali Ferzat, whose hands were broken in 2011, provides a bleak backdrop to the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

The Home Office has renewed Serco's contract to run the Yarl's Wood detention centre. Photo: Getty Images
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 27 Nov 2014

The detention centre in Buckinghamshire, where 400 women await deportation, has been dogged by allegations of mistreatment - so why has the company which has run it for the last seven years been awarded a new contract?

Naples.
By New Statesman - 17 Sep 2014

The critics’ verdicts on Ian McEwan’s The Children Act, A N Wilson’s Victoria: A Life and Elena Ferrante’s Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay.

Gazans are suffering, says resident Ghada Al Kord. Photo: Alison Baskerville, CARE
By Ghada Al Kord - 25 Jul 2014

Palestinian Ghada Al Kord tells of the difficulties of navigating a warzone while pregnant and the indignity of being trapped in Gaza. 

By Lucy Fisher - 22 Jul 2014

The number of female genital mutilation survivors in the UK is double the official NHS estimate, according to a new report.

Blogs

The Conservatives are right to deny the toxic suggestion that they would shack up with Farage.
By George Eaton - 30 Jan 2015

The Conservatives are right to deny the toxic suggestion that they would shack up with Farage. 

The migrant vote is driving the Conservatives' poor performance in London.
By Tim Wigmore - 30 Jan 2015

The migrant vote is driving the Conservatives' poor performance in London.

Shadow Northern Ireland secretary says former New Labour ministers "would have been the very people lecturing others".
By George Eaton - 30 Jan 2015

Shadow Northern Ireland secretary says former New Labour ministers "would have been the very people lecturing others". 

By Tom Humberstone - 30 Jan 2015

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Real wages for 22-29 year olds down 9 per cent on 2008 Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty
By Ashley Cowburn - 30 Jan 2015

Nearly all groups have seen a decline in real wages since the financial crash of 2008 but losses have not been spread out equally. 

By Tim Wigmore - 29 Jan 2015

Because of the new system, there is a risk that students will turn up to vote on 7 May, but won't be registered.

International politics

Eugene de Kock at a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) hearing in Pretoria 1998. Photo: Walter Dhladhla/AFP/Getty
By Oliver Griffin - 30 Jan 2015

Eugene de Kock, the former commander of the apartheid government’s infamous Vlakplaas unit, has been granted parole after serving 20 years of his two life sentences.

Syriza supporters wave flags at a 2014 rally. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
By Mehdi Hasan - 29 Jan 2015

Opposing the logic of neoliberal economics does not mean the Greeks have become Marxists.

Oil barrels. Photo: Miguel Gutierrez/AFP/Getty Images
By Felix Martin - 29 Jan 2015

The falling oil price may sound like a positive thing, but it follows a series of worrying events in global economics.

In Iraqi security officer guards a church. Photo: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images
By Gerard Russell - 29 Jan 2015

A religious revival is just one of the factors leaving Christians deserting the Middle East. Diversity must be upheld.

ANEL leader Panos Kammenos arrives for a cabinet meeting. Photo: LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images
By Theodora Oikonomides - 28 Jan 2015

After a rebuff from the Communist Party of Greece, ANEL became an unlikely coalition partner. But the deal shows Syriza's priorities.

Alexis Tsipras in Athens, January 2015. Photo:  ANGELOS TZORTZINIS/AFP/Getty Images
By Mark Leonard - 28 Jan 2015

New Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras may be the man who consigns centrist politics to history.

Environment

Stacked peat turf in Connemara. Photo: Tim Graham/Rex
By John Burnside - 27 Jan 2015

94 percent of our peat bogs have been destroyed. Saving them is a vital step in securing our planet's future.

Growing appeal: the Green Party's only MP, Caroline Lucas. Photo: David Levene/Eyevine
By Tim Wigmore - 06 Nov 2014

In 2010, there was little to suggest that Ukip would comprehensively surpass the Greens. While Lucas won the seat of Brighton Pavilion, Nigel Farage came in third when he tried to oust John Bercow in Buckingham.

Houses not covered by the coalition's Flood Re scheme could become uninsurable. Photo: Getty
By Guy Shrubsole - 12 Aug 2014

New Conservative Environment Secretary Liz Truss ahd her Lib Dem coalition partners need to be clear on how they will better protect Britain from climate change.

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence.
By Bob Ward - 30 Jul 2014

On climate change and other issues, parliamentarians are ignoring the evidence. 

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.
By Ed Wallis - 09 Jun 2014

People need to be able to feel they can effect change in their own backyard before they can change the world.

They're wrong: John Oliver prepares to do battle with climate deniers
By Hillary Kelly - 13 May 2014

John Oliver, once of The Daily Show, and America's “Science Guy” Bill Nye show the world how to debate with climate-change deniers. 

Law

The atrium at HMP Pentonville in London. Photo: Ian Waldie/Getty
By Andrew Katzen - 27 Jan 2015

Thanks to our ageing population and the surge in harsher sentences, British prisons are slowly turning into dysfunctional nursing homes.

It has been pointed out that Justice Secretary Chris Grayling is quite often the defendant in judicial review proceedings. Photo: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 09 Dec 2014

Judicial review is the mechanism by which citizens can hold the government to its own laws. With the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, the justice secretary is trying to put it out of reach.

A view of a sign at Greenwich Magistrates Court is pictured in south-east London, on July 10, 2008. Photo: Getty Images
By David Banks - 08 Dec 2014

Coverage of our courts is being censored - because magistrates are too quick to impose unnecessary reporting restrictions. In the interests of open justice, this has to stop.

 

What place does the law have in what happens privately between consenting adults? Photo: Getty
By Jane Fae - 01 Dec 2014

The Ministry of Justice has begun a review process into a law that is widely recognised as outdated, archaic in language, and Victorian in its approach. But do they really want to change anything?

The atrium at HMP Pentonville in London. Photo: Ian Waldie/Getty
By Lilian Pizzichini - 28 Nov 2014

Sweden’s prison population is shrinking, and they are actually closing facilities because they aren’t needed. What are they doing differently?

Not this kind of tiger, clearly. Photo: Getty
By Margaret Corvid - 27 Oct 2014

Experts predicted that the law would result in fewer than 30 cases a year. Instead, there have been thousands of convictions. The Act is not fit for purpose.