Opinionomics: today's best analysis and opinion

1. Is Heathrow in the Wrong Place? (SERC)

Paul Cheshire, of LSE's Spatial Economics Research Centre, assesses Justine Greening's claim that "if you were starting from scratch", Heathrow is in the wrong place.

2. The Social Cost of Motoring (Lovelo Bicycles)

A look at what the true cost of motoring may be if all the externalities were taken into account.

3. Encouraging news on jobs, but far too early to call a labour market recovery (Left Foot Forward)

Richard Exell analyses yesterday's KPMG report on jobs, and asks how far we can trust the information contained within.

4. All the signs are there for another credit crunch (Debtonation)

Britain’s crisis is one of a vast bubble of private sector debt, writes Debtonation. These private debts eclipse – by a huge margin – our public sector debt as a share of the national cake. They help explain why the economy struggles to recover from the shocks of 2007-9, and why the banks still pose a grave systemic threat.

5. Finally, Spain (New York Times)

Paul Krugman argues that Spain, not Greece, is the quintessential euro crisis country.

A plane stocks up at Heathrow Terminal 5. Credit: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.