Opinionomics: today's best analysis and opinion

Was the Greek default the best result? And did inequality lead to the financial crisis?

1. Why our pension schemes and arrangements do not work (Tax Research UK)

Richard Murphy suggests that we are thinking of pensions the wrong way, and that while we cling to our faulty conception, they will never be financially viable.

2. Britain can do without a Pol Pot of banking (The Telegraph)

Jeremy Warner argues against Vince Cable's desire for a British Investment Bank, claiming that it is just a chance to give the government yet more power over spending.

3. The Eurozone youth of today (FT alphaville)

Lisa Pollack looks at why the Eurozone has such a staggering level of youth unemployment.

4. How to love a Greek default (BBC)

Robert Peston explains why the news from Greece this morning is probably the best we could have hoped for.

5. Inequality & the crisis (Stumbling and mumbling)

Was inequality to blame for the financial crisis? asks Chris Dillow

Thousands of students march against youth unemployment in Rome. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
Show Hide image

What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.