Opinionomics: must-read analysis and comment

A merry Charles Murray, the mansion tax and David Blanchflower on the Budget.

1. Osborne should invest in jobs to beat depression – not cut the 50p tax rate (Independent)

David Blanchflower calls for the Chancellor to give firms renewed incentive to hire and invest in the UK, rather than spending billions cutting tax for the wealthiest in the nation.

2. How a mansion tax helps the rich (Stumbling and Mumbling)

Supporters of a mansion tax seem to have overlooked something - that such a tax would not be a tax upon the rich so much as upon the older rich, writes Tyler Cowen.

3. Out of sight, out of mind, still on the books (Economist)

The result of less visible public spending is that voters are less able to make informed judgments about their governments' expenditures, argues Free Exchange

4. Free-Trade Blinders (Project Syndicate)

Fetishizing globalization simply because it expands the economic pie is the surest way to delegitimize it in the long run, writes Dani Rodrik, who presents a remarkable example as to why we should assess whether we actually believe our own arguments.

5. Lunch with the FT: Charles Murray (Financial Times)

The social scientist talks to Ed Luce about black-truffle pasta, blue-collar America, and why the Republican party’s candidates for the White House fill him with despair.

Mansion, taxed: Wrest Park, in Sisloe, England. Credit: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"