Opinionomics: must-read analysis and comment

Can't handle the heat? Maybe the Tea Party isn't for you.

1. Tea Party can thank the sun for success (Bloomberg View)

Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers write about an interesting finding to do with the original Tea Party protests in 2009.

2. We need more housing urgently, but not at any cost (Guardian)

The government must resist the anti-development lobby to get more houses built and use local councils to drive change, writes Peter Hetherington.

3. Mystery over delay in top-rate tax cut (BBC)

Robert Peston mulls over the possiblity of the cut in income tax being delayed.

4. Let’s say it now – general anti-avoidance rules increase certainty and are good for honest business (Tax Research UK)

Richard Murphy comes out to bat for a general anti-avoidance rule (which he doesn't think will be in the budget).

5. World GDP (Graphic Detail)

The world’s economic growth continued to slow in the final quarter of 2011, as Graphic Detail shows.

Sunrise over Salisbury: Does our cloudy weather stop protests? Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.