Opinionomics: must-read analysis and comment

Featuring century bonds, Ben Bernanke, and patented mice.

1. Buying 100-year bonds looks like a gilt-edged way to lose money (Telegraph)

Ian Cowie doesn't think buying 100-year bonds would be the best investment.

2. The Villain (Atlantic)

Roger Lowenstein interviews Ben Bernanke.

3. Pop Bonds (Marginal Revolution)

Alex Tabarrok reports on social impact bonds, an innovative new way of using the private sector to perform public goods.

4. Institutions and the new new thing (Economist)

Free Exchange present an interesting argument for patent reform.

5. Inequality offensive (MIT News)

At an MIT forum, economists evaluate the consequences of increasing inequality in America, and suggest solutions.

Ben Bernanke testifies before the Senate. Credit: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.