Opinionomics: must-read analysis and comment

Featuring high tax, high art and high interest rates.

1. Gordon Brown is nowhere, yet everywhere (Independent)

Without acknowledgement from either side, it is Brown's rulebook that persists, writes Steve Richards.

2. How business can bypass banks (BBC)

A wonkish piece from Robert Peston, looking at one easy way to boost lending to small and medium enterprises: letting them borrow against invoices from big businesses.

3. Would a Higher Top Tax Rate Raise Revenues? (New York Times)

Bruce Bartlett presents an American angle on a question that has been asked in Britain for a while.

4. Auction-house opacity datapoint of the day (Reuters)

A bizarre piece of misdirection from the world of fine art becomes an enlightening microeconomic case-study for Felix Salmon.

5. A century of gilt (FT alphaville)

Joseph Cotterill goes into depth on the Chancellor's plan to sell 100-year bonds.

Gordon Brown's rulebook persists in Westminster today. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.