Opinionomics: Cream of the commentators

The best of the economics op-eds and blogs from this morning and last night

 

1. Labour can't have it both ways on bonuses (The Telegraph)

Some of Ed’s team want to stop City payouts, others to tax them to pay for pet projects, notes Jeff Randall.

2. How many cheers for British companies? (BBC)

Labour's leader Ed Miliband wants us to give more patriotic support to UK businesses. But in an economy as open as the UK's, it is not easy to identify which companies are more or less British, writes Robert Peston.

3. OPEC and Uncle Sam (The Economist)

Taxation of petrol affects propensity to consume differently from market-driven price changes, writes Free Exchange. This is good news for those wanting to reduce consumption, but bad if fuel taxes are intended to raise revenue.

4. And Now for Some Good News (Climateer Investing)

The future isn't all doom and gloom, as the background of new technological marvels shows that the world is overdue a leap forward comparable to computing.

5. Newspapers are completely out at sea (Digitopoly)

The future is digital but the money still isn’t there, writes Joshua Gans. But what's interesting about newspapers isn't how disrupted they are but how slowly change is occurring.

 

Petrol prices near $5 a gallon in LA. Credit: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.