Opinionomics: Cream of the commentators

The best of the economics op-eds and blogs from this morning and last night

 

1. Labour can't have it both ways on bonuses (The Telegraph)

Some of Ed’s team want to stop City payouts, others to tax them to pay for pet projects, notes Jeff Randall.

2. How many cheers for British companies? (BBC)

Labour's leader Ed Miliband wants us to give more patriotic support to UK businesses. But in an economy as open as the UK's, it is not easy to identify which companies are more or less British, writes Robert Peston.

3. OPEC and Uncle Sam (The Economist)

Taxation of petrol affects propensity to consume differently from market-driven price changes, writes Free Exchange. This is good news for those wanting to reduce consumption, but bad if fuel taxes are intended to raise revenue.

4. And Now for Some Good News (Climateer Investing)

The future isn't all doom and gloom, as the background of new technological marvels shows that the world is overdue a leap forward comparable to computing.

5. Newspapers are completely out at sea (Digitopoly)

The future is digital but the money still isn’t there, writes Joshua Gans. But what's interesting about newspapers isn't how disrupted they are but how slowly change is occurring.

 

Petrol prices near $5 a gallon in LA. Credit: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"