Opinionomics: Cream of the commentators

The best of the blogs and op-eds from this morning and last night

1. Will there be a British Business Bank? (BBC)

Following the leak of Vince Cable's letter to the Chancellor, and the Treasury acknowledging that he was overruled, Robert Peston asks, "what is the state of play on the government's ambition to correct the perceived lack of credit for small and medium-sized businesses?"

2. Recalculating Romney’s Four Percent Gimmick (The Cato Institute)

Christopher Preble takes a look, from a hard-libertarian angle, at Mitt Romney's promise to spend 4 per cent of GDP on the military.

3. Can Matter succeed? (Reuters)

Felix Salmond looks at innovative new journalism startup Matter, and debates whether or not it has a chance.

4. Knights, damsels, and tax-advantaged debt buybacks (FT alphaville)

Lisa Pollack explains exactly what the dodgy tax deal that sparked Barclay's wrist-slapping from HMRC involved, saying, "It’s as if the Knights dressed up as Damsels and rescued themselves."

5. Scale models (Free Exchange)

The Economist explains the importance of transport costs and returns to scale in looking at where future economic activity is likely to end up.

Vince Cable arrives for a cabinet meeting. Credit: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.