Good vibrations: one of the participants of the video for Go to Go
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Empowering new genre or just another remix? All-women Dutch band ADAM perform techno hit while orgasming

The women of Dutch techno band ADAM have been a bit of a YouTube hit with their song Go to Go – which they try to sing while using vibrators.

A Dutch electronic band called ADAM have released their debut music video, in which the five band members eschew the coy innuendo of most pop offerings by simply orgasming while attempting to sing their single, Go to Go. 

With vibrators out of shot, and simply their knowing smiles in view, there is something particularly joyful and liberating about this video. And it's a pretty good beat. That's what you get when you mix electro, feminism, and, err, web-based marketing strategies (the song is on sale this week).

Have a watch:

I'm a mole, innit.

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Poem: "When the Americans came"

“Do you have vampires around here?”

When the Americans came,

they didn’t take to our gardens:

the apple orchard smelling of wild garlic,

foxgloves growing among the runner beans.


“Do you have vampires around here?”

a visitor from Carolina asked me.

It was a shambles, Wilfred knew that,

nodding wisely as though apologising


for the ill manners of King George,

the clematis purple in the thatched roofing.

But come the softe sonne,

there are oxlips in Fry’s woods,


forget-me-nots in the shallow stream,

lettuce and spring onions for a salad.

It’s certain that fine women eat

A crazy salad with their meat*


I tried to tell them. But they weren’t women,

and didn’t care to listen to a boy.

They preferred the red rosehips

we used for making wine.


Danced outside the village church

round the maypole Jack Parnham made.

Now they’re gone,

the wild garlic has returned.


* W B Yeats, “A Prayer for My Daughter”


William Bedford is a novelist, children’s author and poet. His eighth collection of verse, The Bread Horse, is published by Red Squirrel Press.

This article first appeared in the 20 October 2016 issue of the New Statesman, Brothers in blood