Show Hide image

Syria gets a taste for protest

After events in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Bahrain, Syrian citizens have finally found a voice agains

There are small numbers of tourists in the old city of Damascus and the many foreign students who come to Syria to study Arabic haven't left. May Mamarbachi, a tourism and travel operator, is running her business as usual - more or less. She has just sent some clients to Palmyra, and confirms that Bosra, with its Roman amphitheatre, is safe. "We are only avoiding Latakia," she says briskly.

As well they should. Latakia, Syria's principal port city and seaside resort, located north-west of Damascus, has joined Deraa as the latest hot spot. Clashes between protesters and military police there have led to beatings, arrests and 12 deaths in the past week. The military are still on the streets. The relative calm in Damascus belies a situation that is constantly changing and the mood is tense. The government is on the defensive; careless talk could lead to trouble.

Bashar bashing

There has been much commentary in the international media about which way President Bashar al-Assad will go: whether he will continue the crackdown or manage to persuade protesters that his proposed reforms are convincing and will happen. On 24 March, a state spokeswoman announced that there would be extensive concessions, including the release of political prisoners and a "study" into the possibility of ending emergency laws that have been in place since 1963. However, the next day security forces reacted violently to the protests in Deraa, Latakia and elsewhere.

The moves exposed a government unwilling - perhaps unable - to keep its promises, amid disagreement within the security forces, intelligence services (the notorious mukhabarat) and Assad's inner circle. The cabinet resigned on 29 March in an attempt to allay the protests. At the time of going to press on 30 March, the president was due to address his people and announce details of the reforms.

Unrest began in early March in the south in Deraa, where teenagers were arrested for scrawling subversive graffiti on walls. The ensuing protests there and in other cities were put down by security forces on 18 March. Government officials blamed foreigners, infiltrators or armed gangs for the chaos. The trouble has continued for many days now, and at least 60 people have been killed there alone. The city is surrounded and besieged, and electricity and telephone networks have been cut intermittently. Armed forces entered the city, dispersing crowds with tear gas. There was a report that agents confiscated wheat supplies from bakeries just before the siege to squeeze the rebellious population.

That the unrest has reached Latakia is an important development, because the city is religiously mixed. Mostly Sunni, it is, however, a heartland of the Alawites, the minority Shia sect to which the Assads belong, and also home to many Christians. This means that sectarianism and Sunni resentment against the ruling Alawites cannot be blamed for the uprisings.

While the situations in Deraa and Latakia are the most severe, there have been protests all over the country. On Friday 25 March, which activists called the Day of Dignity, there were demonstrations in central and suburban Damascus, Homs, Hama, Aleppo, Idlib, Tafas and other towns. Some were small and ended without trouble. Larger protests were aggressively dispersed by the military police.

Hama brings particularly emotive memories for Syrians, who recall how President Hafez al-Assad, Bashar's father, massacred tens of thousands of residents in 1982 after a revolt led by the Muslim Brotherhood resulted in the city being besieged by special forces units and soldiers. Hama had been the organisational centre of Islamist guerrilla attacks against the Ba'athist regime. The brutal suppression was a decisive blow against Islamism in Syria.

Pro-government demonstrators, too, have been out on the streets in Damascus, in particularly large numbers on 29 March. Ausama Monajed, an activist and Syrian exile who runs a media information network for the revolution, is not surprised by their appearance. He says pro-government supporters "are mostly employees of companies owned by the political-business elite" - for example, the mobile-phone companies MTN and Syriatel. The latter, whose offices in Deraa were burned by protesters, is owned by the president's cousin Rami Makhlouf. People were encouraged to attend the pro-Assad rallies: schools were closed for the day and civil servants given time off. But Monajed believes that most were forced.

The net effect

While people in the capital remain mostly silent, they keep a keen - and discreet - eye on events by watching al-Jazeera and foreign news channels. State television is notoriously unreliable. They are also using the internet, where mobile uploads of demonstrations in many parts of the country are posted. As in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, these are effective at spreading news and rallying support.

Facebook is buzzing with images of people in Deraa dismantling the statue of Hafez al-Assad, of crowds shouting for freedom and, in some cases, of protesters being sprayed with tear gas or bullets.

Assad is said to have the support of the prosperous middle classes and religious minorities, which he protects; some believe he is a moderate surrounded by the severe state security apparatus established by his father. Activists dismiss such arguments as excuses. Instead, to counter misinformation that the protests are sectarian, they are organising nationwide rallies to be held on 1 April, the "Day of Unity". At first serenely unaffected by the flames that have set the Middle East alight, Syria is now unmistakably feeling the heat, and much depends on the reaction to the president's speech.

This article first appeared in the 04 April 2011 issue of the New Statesman, Who are the English?

Getty
Show Hide image

The New Times: Brexit, globalisation, the crisis in Labour and the future of the left

With essays by David Miliband, Paul Mason, John Harris, Lisa Nandy, Vince Cable and more.

Once again the “new times” are associated with the ascendancy of the right. The financial crash of 2007-2008 – and the Great Recession and sovereign debt crises that were a consequence of it – were meant to have marked the end of an era of runaway “turbocapitalism”. It never came close to happening. The crash was a crisis of capitalism but not the crisis of capitalism. As Lenin observed, there is “no such thing as an absolutely hopeless situation” for capitalism, and so we discovered again. Instead, the greatest burden of the period of fiscal retrenchment that followed the crash was carried by the poorest in society, those most directly affected by austerity, and this in turn has contributed to a deepening distrust of elites and a wider crisis of governance.

Where are we now and in which direction are we heading?

Some of the contributors to this special issue believe that we have reached the end of the “neoliberal” era. I am more sceptical. In any event, the end of neoliberalism, however you define it, will not lead to a social-democratic revival: it looks as if, in many Western countries, we are entering an age in which centre-left parties cannot form ruling majorities, having leaked support to nationalists, populists and more radical alternatives.

Certainly the British Labour Party, riven by a war between its parliamentary representatives and much of its membership, is in a critical condition. At the same time, Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership has inspired a remarkable re-engagement with left-wing politics, even as his party slumps in the polls. His own views may seem frozen in time, but hundreds of thousands of people, many of them young graduates, have responded to his anti-austerity rhetoric, his candour and his shambolic, unspun style.

The EU referendum, in which as much as one-third of Labour supporters voted for Brexit, exposed another chasm in Labour – this time between educated metropolitan liberals and the more socially conservative white working class on whose loyalty the party has long depended. This no longer looks like a viable election-winning coalition, especially after the collapse of Labour in Scotland and the concomitant rise of nationalism in England.

In Marxism Today’s “New Times” issue of October 1988, Stuart Hall wrote: “The left seems not just displaced by Thatcherism, but disabled, flattened, becalmed by the very prospect of change; afraid of rooting itself in ‘the new’ and unable to make the leap of imagination required to engage the future.” Something similar could be said of the left today as it confronts Brexit, the disunities within the United Kingdom, and, in Theresa May, a prime minister who has indicated that she might be prepared to break with the orthodoxies of the past three decades.

The Labour leadership contest between Corbyn and Owen Smith was largely an exercise in nostalgia, both candidates seeking to revive policies that defined an era of mass production and working-class solidarity when Labour was strong. On matters such as immigration, digital disruption, the new gig economy or the power of networks, they had little to say. They proposed a politics of opposition – against austerity, against grammar schools. But what were they for? Neither man seemed capable of embracing the “leading edge of change” or of making the imaginative leap necessary to engage the future.

So is there a politics of the left that will allow us to ride with the currents of these turbulent “new times” and thus shape rather than be flattened by them? Over the next 34 pages 18 writers, offering many perspectives, attempt to answer this and related questions as they analyse the forces shaping a world in which power is shifting to the East, wars rage unchecked in the Middle East, refugees drown en masse in the Mediterranean, technology is outstripping our capacity to understand it, and globalisation begins to fragment.

— Jason Cowley, Editor 

Tom Kibasi on what the left fails to see

Philip Collins on why it's time for Labour to end its crisis

John Harris on why Labour is losing its heartland

Lisa Nandy on how Labour has been halted and hollowed out

David Runciman on networks and the digital revolution

John Gray on why the right, not the left, has grasped the new times

Mariana Mazzucato on why it's time for progressives to rethink capitalism

Robert Ford on why the left must reckon with the anger of those left behind

Ros Wynne-Jones on the people who need a Labour government most

Gary Gerstle on Corbyn, Sanders and the populist surge

Nick Pearce on why the left is haunted by the ghosts of the 1930s

Paul Mason on why the left must be ready to cause a commotion

Neal Lawson on what the new, 21st-century left needs now

Charles Leadbeater explains why we are all existentialists now

John Bew mourns the lost left

Marc Stears on why democracy is a long, hard, slow business

Vince Cable on how a financial crisis empowered the right

David Miliband on why the left needs to move forward, not back

This article first appeared in the 22 September 2016 issue of the New Statesman, The New Times