Here comes the science bit

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Embyros in a lab in California. Photo: Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images
Now we can edit the human genome, the question is: should we?
By Michael Brooks - 05 May 8:18

Some of the diseases that could be cured are far more distressing than mutations in an embyro that was never going to develop anyway.

These red, orange and green clouds (false color) in Saturn's northern hemisphere indicate the tail end of the massive 2010-2011 storm. Photo: NASA
Storms from outer space: some things are just too impressive to appreciate
By Michael Brooks - 29 April 8:34

We know more about life in space – and at home – than ever before. But what do we do with that knowledge?

A hard problem for soft brains: is there a Hard Problem?
By Michael Brooks - 16 April 15:29

Daniel Dennett wants to convince Tom Stoppard that there is no Hard Problem.

Jeremy Clarkson. Photo: Mark Thompson/Getty Images
The neuroscience of Jeremy Clarkson
By Michael Brooks - 26 March 15:33

If humans can’t control themselves, they cannot be allowed the freedoms others enjoy: humans learn self-control, she says, in the same way that toddlers learn to control their bladders.

A patient in bed touches their stomach. Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Researchers have a gut feeling - could chronic pain be caused by bacteria?
By Michael Brooks - 19 March 12:07

This month, researchers are gathering in Cambridge to try and work out why we hurt. Michael Brooks weighs up one suggestion.

Scientists undertake Gamma Knife surgery, one treatment for ocular melanoma. Photo: Bertrand Langlois/AFP/Getty Images
Spare a thought for “orphan” drugs: the rare disease medicines that prove health is a numbers game
By Michael Brooks - 05 March 9:09

Oliver Sacks wrote of his imminent death with remarkable dignity, knowing science cannot help him. But what about the cases where it might?

Why not? Robots dancing in Madrid's robot museum. Photo: Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images
Nuclear armaments? Global warming? All hail our robot overlords!
By Michael Brooks - 26 February 11:09

I, for one, accept our new robot politicians.

Realistic-colour image of Europa. Photo: NASA / Jet Propulsion Lab-Caltech / SETI Institute
Is there life on Jupiter’s ice moon?
By Michael Brooks - 18 February 10:25

If only politics worked half as well as space exploration.

A cloud of dust and gas in space. Photo: Nasa/Getty Images
A handful of cosmic dust: revealing the roots of our existence
By Michael Brooks - 12 February 11:19

It's time to appreciate space dust.

White mice in a lab. Photo: China Photos/Getty Images
New research in blood sharing forces us to ask: how far will we go to beat ageing?
By Michael Brooks - 05 February 11:36

In mice, young blood can rejuvinate the arteries and even neurones of the old. But humans may be wary.

Capsules containing ketamine. Photo: Nicolas Asfouri/AFP
Could ketamine stop suicide?
By Michael Brooks - 29 January 8:00

The drug has been proven as a reliever of suicidal thoughts. With some doctors reluctant to prescribe SSRIs, it could provide the answer.

A light bulb. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
How harnessing the strangeness of light allows science to shine
By Michael Brooks - 22 January 10:10

From eyecare to creating the coldest thing in the universe, lasers show science at its most illuminating.

23andMe Co-Founder Anne Wojcicki. Photo: Kimberly White/Getty Images
23andMe: Why bother with predictions about yourself when you are almost certainly average?
By Michael Brooks - 15 January 9:06

Want to understand your genes? Call your parents.

Tuck in: a 1955 Christmas dinner. Photo: Getty
Why festive indulgence is good for you
By Michael Brooks - 22 December 15:11

What should you do to stay happy and healthy this Christmas? You’ll like the first piece of advice: if you want to relax, you could try eating a big meal.

The Betatron, which was used in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Photo: Getty
Protecting planet earth from killer electrons
By Michael Brooks - 11 December 9:37

Our planet has hidden life-protection systems that continue to surprise us.

Dark skies: a view of the milky way during a meteor shower, Myanmar. Photo: Getty
Dark energy vs dark matter: a battle of two cosmic monsters
By Michael Brooks - 04 December 10:00

Michael Brooks’s Science Column.

Powerful you have become: a 3D-printed model of Star Wars' Yoda. Photo: Getty
Made in space: Sending 3D printers into orbit
By Michael Brooks - 27 November 10:00

The ESA wants to test a 3D printer in orbit because this is likely to be the best place and method of building the equipment that will take us further out.

High voltage: Hinkley power stations near Bristol. Photo: Getty
Path of least resistance: the quest for room-temperature superconductors
By Michael Brooks - 20 November 10:00

Michael Brooks’s Science Column. 

Strange fish: Lake Malawi is home to some unique species. Photo: Getty
Genes are not as important as you might think
By Michael Brooks - 13 November 10:00

Michael Brooks’s Science Column. 

Speeding ahead: the Lockheed stand at an aviation trade show in 2012. Photo: Getty
Forever 20 years away: will we ever have a working nuclear fusion reactor?
By Michael Brooks - 06 November 10:00

Lockheed Martin has announced that it already has a small-scale fusion energy generator. In ten years’ time, it says, it will have developed a reactor large enough to power a city and small enough to sit on the back of a truck.

Vanishing act: the Italian physicist Ettore Majorana, who disappeared in 1938. Photo: Kanijoman/Flickr
The vanishing particle physicist and the puzzle he left behind
By Michael Brooks - 30 October 9:00

Ettore Majorana was an Italian physicist, the best of his generation, who disappeared in mysterious circumstances in 1938.

Illustration: André Carrilho
The great ebola scare
By Michael Brooks - 19 October 9:03

It is being called the most severe health emergency of modern times. But are the fears of mass contagion in the west overblown?

Autumn rain: being damp is inferred rather than truly felt. Photo: Getty
On our nerves: what makes us itch or feel wet?
By Michael Brooks - 16 October 10:00

Michael Brooks’s science column. 

Hope injection: women with their pets at a rabies vaccination centre in India. Photo: Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images
Preventing rabies: the dog jabs that can save humans
By Michael Brooks - 09 October 10:00

Responsibility for treatment of infected people falls on human health services. It is difficult to create an alliance against rabies until animal and human health experts co-ordinate.

The implications of this research is profound. Photo: Getty
Is it a man or a mouse?
By Michael Brooks - 02 October 9:00

Scientists have a simple recipe for creating a more human-like mouse: just alter its DNA very slightly.

Part of a new permanent exhibition at the Cité des Sciences et de l'Industrie in Paris dedicated to the human brain. Photo: Getty
How it is possible to live fairly normally with half your brain missing
By Michael Brooks - 22 September 11:10

Chinese researchers have recently reported a case of a woman found to have no cerebellum, a part of the brain that usually contains half of its neurons.

A row of traditional American mailboxes. Photo: Andrew Taylor/Flickr
Reprivatising the internet: how physics helps you hide from spooks
By Michael Brooks - 18 September 10:00

Tim Berners-Lee has publicly called for programmers to develop better, more user-friendly cryptography. That way, he says, we can all get back to living private lives again.

Starry, starry night: the Perseid meteor shower seen from Burma, 2013. Photo: Getty
Pleiades row: the fault in our star measurements
By Michael Brooks - 11 September 10:00

Either our understanding of how stars form needs a big overhaul, or one of the current missions of the European Space Agency could turn out to be something of a white elephant.

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