Cartoon by Ralph Steadman
Rupert’s red top: the rise and fall of Rebekah Brooks
By Peter Jukes - 17 July 10:00

Peter Jukes watched the former tabloid editor’s extraordinary composure in court on every day of the hacking trial. Her story tells you everything you need to know about the way power works.

Andy Coulson arriving at the Old Bailey for sentencing. Photo: Getty
Andy Coulson jailed for 18 months for conspiracy to hack phones
By New Statesman - 04 July 10:36

Former No 10 communications director and News of the World editor is sentenced.

An audience member uses a smartphone during a political event. Photo: Getty
My year as Benedict Brogan’s “little slave”
By Tim Wigmore - 26 June 12:01

Now that Benedict Brogan has departed the Telegraph, Tim Wigmore – who used to help write his Morning Briefing email – remembers how it used to come together.

Dame Angelina: Jolie delivers her speech at the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict, London 13 June. Photo: Getty
Naughty parents, supermarket schooling and Angelina Jolie's campaigning
By Peter Wilby - 26 June 10:00

Peter Wilby’s First Thoughts column.

Why would a grieving family want to hear from a not-quite England footballer, Ian Wright?
By Media Mole - 24 June 10:17

The Sun columnist says football players shirking international duty should have to call the parents of someone killed in Afghanistan and explain themselves. What?

They who shout loudest: an onlooker with a megaphone at the Tour de France, 2013. Photo: Getty
Social media is important for journos but let’s keep things in proportion
By Ed Smith - 19 June 16:30

A tiny online minority has a disproportionately loud voice. It is important to remember the weak correlation between the things we know some readers think and what readers, in totality, really think. 

Josie Cunningham. Photo: @JosieCOnline
Josie Cunningham and the Big Brother abortion: why do some women volunteer for a witch-burning?
By Sarah Ditum - 23 April 10:47

Josie Cunningham became famous for revealing she had her breasts enlarged on the NHS. Now she says she wants an abortion to go on Big Brother. In her determination to incite outrage, Cunningham is basically Abu Hamza with a double-D cup. Why do it?

Commuters travelling by train at Waterloo Railway Station, London, c1939.
Is the age of a newspaper’s “imperial editor” over? Or just beginning?
By Ian Leslie - 14 April 9:55

Now that we have infinite space on the internet and huge volumes of data about what people read, is there a role for the powerful individual who shapes a publication according to personal taste?

Your move, Modi. Photo: Getty
The Mumbai Mirror makes the most sarcastic newspaper "correction" of all time
By Media Mole - 03 April 11:50

Offers "sincere and unconditional hypocrisy".

The panel on Monday's Newsnight. L-R: Dr Peiris, Dr Aderin-Pocock, Jeremy Paxman, Associate Professor Pryke. (Image: Screengrab)
UCL calls out Daily Mail for complaining that women of colour can’t be scientists
By Ian Steadman - 21 March 10:14

BBC's Newsnight relied on two British experts to help explain this week's momentous discovery of primordial gravitational waves – but the Mail thinks they could only have been chosen for “diversity” reasons.

L'Wren Scott and Mick Jagger at her show at New York Fashion Week in 2012. Photo: Getty
Mick Jagger on the front pages: so much for the post-Leveson chill
By Media Mole - 18 March 10:16

Four papers carried photos of the star at the moment he was told of his girlfriend's death. The chilling, censoring effect of the Leveson Inquiry that everyone was so worried about seems not to have kicked in yet. . .

Page 3 vs breast cancer: whose side are YOU on?
By Sarah Ditum - 04 March 14:29

The Sun's Page 3 is a malignant growth of sexism on our press, and trying to use it to raise awareness of breast cancer only perpetuates the kind of single-organ fetishism that makes it all the harder for women with the disease.

Hold the front page: rail travellers in 1850
Newspapers: still the most important medium for understanding the world
By Peter Wilby - 12 February 9:26

Once new media themselves, newspapers have gone on to outlast cinema and television – but for how long?

Daily Mail annoyed at Bob Crow for booking his “luxury holiday” through the Daily Mail
By Media Mole - 04 February 15:02

The only thing worse than a union boss on a luxury holiday is a union boss getting a discount on his luxury holiday thanks to a voucher offer.

Tony Gallagher.
The sacked editor, the art of failing better and the Lib Dems’ portly “groping peer”
By Peter Wilby - 22 January 11:04

The old yardsticks of success no longer apply in a digital age: profitability, circulation, scoops. And with the Guardian's sale of its stake in Auto Trader, the newspaper world is taking huge risks.

Daily Telegraph editor Tony Gallagher leaves the paper
By Media Mole - 21 January 12:42

Chris Evans will become acting editor for the weekday paper. Is a total restructure in the offing?

Paul Dacre by Ralph Steadman.
Paul Dacre of the Daily Mail: The man who hates liberal Britain
By Peter Wilby - 02 January 10:30

He's the most successful and most feared newspaperman of his generation. But after a bad year in which he was forced to defend his methods, how much longer can Dacre survive as editor-in-chief of the <em>Daily Mail</em>?

The topsy–turvy world of newspaper regulation and government spies
By Martin Moore - 25 November 14:07

Press Freedom, Leveson, GCHQ and the Mad Hatter's Tea Party.

Alex Ferguson, former manager of Manchester United
Why are football clubs able to ban journalists when they don't like what they report?
By Martin Cloake - 01 November 14:38

Reporters across the UK are constantly fighting against overbearing clubs and their petty behaviour. As freedom of the press is examined in other spheres, we should remember the sports writers who are trying to balance the need to maintain access with the

The front pages on Coulson and Brooks: spot the odd one out
By Media Mole - 01 November 10:00

One title, renowned for its prurient interests, seems to have strangely missed the story.

New Statesman
As the Daily Mail and Guardian slug it out over MI5 and press reform, who really hates Britain?
By Peter Wilby - 24 October 14:47

Even the editor of the Mail seems less than confident about 'the man who hated Britain' now. Meanwhile, the Guardian featured "the world's leading editors" in a piece that failed to include a single journalist employed by Rupert Murdoch.

New Statesman
Miliband v the Mail, Gordon Brown’s confessions and football’s endgame
By Peter Wilby - 10 October 15:14

The Mail gave Ed Miliband an opportunity to show that, far from being a calculating figure who knifed his brother, he is motivated by a profound love of “my Dad”.

British newspaper are displayed for sale
Leader: The false choice on press reform
By New Statesman - 09 October 16:11

The underlying principles of this fight have too often been forgotten in a round of score-settling and protection of vested interests.

We need a free press, not a calm, pretty one
By David Banks - 09 October 9:34

The cross-party plan for press regulation is unlikely to work, nor should we let it. Anyway, those proposing greater regulation of the press overestimate its influence and underestimate the good sense of their readers.

The Sun's frontpage for 7 October 2013. Photo via @SuttonNick on Twitter
The Sun's fearmongering about mental health is what's really monstrous
By Laurie Penny - 07 October 14:22

The paper's frontpage claim that "1,200 killed by mental patients" is misleading - and it exposes exactly the kind of prejudice that implies people with mental health problems are violent, unstable monsters.

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