If ifs and buts were candies and nuts, who would win the 2015 general election?
By Media Mole - 24 April 13:15

According to the Telegraph, Ukip are reportedly winning "the Google election". But what other fictional elections could produce a landslide result?

Is Ed Miliband finally becoming cool?
By Media Mole - 22 April 9:07

#CoolEdMiliband

1876's version of naughty pictures. Photo: Getty
Yes, the government has the ability to restrict our ability to see porn online. But would it ever dare to?
By Gilad Rosner - 06 April 20:48

The Tories want to restrict online porn to adults if they win the election. The age verification system needed is possible - but are we happy to let our credit card providers know what we're looking at online?

An onlooker photographs a montage of the Kama Sutra. Photo: Getty
Why I changed my mind about porn
By Sarah Ditum - 01 April 15:04

A few years ago, I argued against the idea that porn was hijacking our sexuality. Now, as a women's centre tries to ban my opponent, I wonder - are they scared that if people listen to Gail Dines, their minds might be changed too?

How far can you trust citizen journalism on the internet?
By Vicky Baker - 25 March 10:55

As the BBC reports that it can receive up to 10,000 pieces of user-generated content on a single day, Vicky Baker looks at the increasing need for verification and how propaganda and hoaxes have become more prevalent.

A protest over police practices in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Getty
The digital ducking stool
By Helen Lewis - 11 March 12:57

As Jon Ronson's new book shows, public shaming is cruel, random and effective - and it flourishes when we have lost trust in the system.

Senator Joe McCarthy. Photo: Getty
Are you now or have you ever been a TERF?
By Terry MacDonald - 16 February 16:39

The term TERF - "trans exclusionary radical feminist" has become internet shorthand for "transphobic bigot". The odd thing is that most people hold beliefs which could see them labelled a "TERF". 

Who will replace Alan Rusbridger at the Guardian?
By Harry Lambert - 10 December 18:40

We break down the runners and riders to be the next Guardian editor, as Alan Rusbridger announces his resignation after 20 years.

The New Republic’s logo – the magazine was founded in 1914.
The New Republic collapses as it turns 100
By Jason Cowley - 10 December 17:10

If the New Statesman has a sister publication, it is the New Republic. The magazine’s collapse provokes us to ask whether such an institution can be more than a vanity project without destroying its purpose and heritage, or losing its political identity altogether.

Mail Online indulges in horrific ebola clickbait
By Media Mole - 20 November 11:29

Absolutely no downside here, nooooooooooo.

Four tips David Cameron can learn from world leaders on how to use Twitter
By Sophie McBain - 26 June 12:24

What tips can David Cameron learn from the annual Twiplomacy report, which studies how world leaders use Twitter? He needs a little help – not only because he's regularly insulted online, but because Barack Obama won't follow him back. 

They who shout loudest: an onlooker with a megaphone at the Tour de France, 2013. Photo: Getty
Social media is important for journos but let’s keep things in proportion
By Ed Smith - 19 June 16:30

A tiny online minority has a disproportionately loud voice. It is important to remember the weak correlation between the things we know some readers think and what readers, in totality, really think. 

Rebekah Brooks arrives for the first day of the trial at the Old Bailey. Photo: Getty
Why and how Peter Jukes live-tweeted the entire phonehacking trial
By Anoosh Chakelian - 12 June 11:04

450,000 words, over 2.5m keystrokes, 12,000 followers and about seven months of coverage later, first-time trial live-tweeter Peter Jukes can finally give his fingers a rest.

Ezra Klein, of new venture Vox. Photo: Getty
Laurie Penny on the real outsiders in New Media: not the white guys who look like the old guard, just younger
By Laurie Penny - 04 April 15:41

From Vox to 538, white guys get feted as the future of journalism while everyone else gets attacked and dismissed.

Numbers can't be treated like words, and we need to stop thinking they can. Photo: Getty
On Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight: is it possible for a data-driven journalist to tell a good story?
By Elizabeth Minkel - 25 March 12:30

The launch of Nate Silver's new FiveThirtyEight site for data-driven reporting has attracted a lot of criticism from big name journalists and pundits. Should numbers rule reporting?

Laurie Penny on Lena Dunham's Girls: it can't represent every woman, but shouldn't have to
By Laurie Penny - 04 February 17:51

In mainstream culture, white, straight, middle-class women don’t get to speak about their experience without having it universalised and made meaningless in the process - but black women, poor women and queer women usually don’t get to speak about their experiences at all

John Nimmo and Isabella Sorley: A tale of two "trolls"
By Helen Lewis - 08 January 13:15

Yesterday, two people - a man and a woman - were convicted of sending threatening tweets to Caroline Criado-Perez. What do their stories tell us about the causes of internet abuse, and how to tackle it?

New Statesman
Laurie Penny: The 20 best online pieces of 2013
By Laurie Penny - 27 December 10:28

Laurie Penny selects her favourite online writing from the last 12 months

footprints in the snow.
The Maryville rape case: social media hurt Daisy Coleman - now it is helping her
By Holly Baxter - 19 October 10:06

Daisy Coleman is the latest in a series of girls to report that they were sexually assaulted and cyberbullied on social media. But we can't blame Twitter and Facebook for the existence of rape culture - and with #justice4daisy, they might have helped end

Yangon.
Out of Print by George Brock: An unfinished and chaotic story
By Emily Bell - 20 September 12:15

Brock convincingly disabuses readers of the notion of a “golden age” of journalism in the postwar period. But he often doesn't go far enough.

How are rape jokes different from murder jokes? Let me count the ways
By Sophia McDougall - 06 September 12:58

If murder was so common that in any medium-sized mixed group I could be pretty sure someone there had been directly affected by murder, you are damn right I wouldn’t make any jokes about murder, writes Sophia McDougall.

Whimsy.
Yahoo! tilts its logo for added whimsy. But how much is too much?
By Alex Hern - 06 September 10:20

Groundbreaking studies in exclamation mark sciences.

New Statesman
The Israeli embassy comes to Buzzfeed
By Media Mole - 28 August 11:31

"Threats Facing Israel, Explained In One (sort Of Terrifying) Map".

How many teenagers are using Ask.fm to self-harm?
By Hazel Robinson - 14 August 11:25

Some of the young people experiencing online abuse will be sending it to themselves, writes Hazel Robinson. That doesn't make their pain any less real - but it should inform how we approach the subject.

New Statesman
Women write just a quarter of accredited stories in our national newspapers
By Bithia Large - 09 August 10:44

Bithia Large studied the number of women writing for eight different newspapers in 2013 and found some depressing results.

Pages