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The editor of The Oldie Richard Ingrams resigns – for being "too old" to attend a disciplinary hearing

The former Private Eye editor and founder of The Oldie resigns following a long-running dispute with the magazine's publisher.

Richard Ingrams, founder and editor of The Oldie, has resigned. Photo: Getty

 

Richard Ingrams, 76, who edited Private Eye for over 20 years, has stood down as editor of The OldieHe co-founded the magazine for the over-60s, which was established to "produce an antidote to youth culture", in 1992.

Ironically, his reason for resigning is because he considers himself "too old". To attend disciplinary meetings, that is. Ingrams has been in a long-running dispute with the magazine's publisher, James Pembroke, whom he describes as "impossible to work with".

Ingrams, who acknowledged that this story is something he'd once have relished at Private Eyecommented:

I had had a long-running dispute with him [Pembroke] about various things, culminating in his summoning me to this disciplinary hearing and saying if I was found guilty of misconduct I would be give a final written warning – in other words, threatened with the sack, really. I was hoping that we could discuss this yesterday [Thursday], but it transpired that Pembroke was determined to have this disciplinary hearing on Monday regardless. I was put in an impossible position, really.

The dispute involves a recent dip in the magazine's sales, as well as disagreements over its front covers. 

Here is a testimonial about The Oldie, from one of its better-known readers, Joan Bakewell:

Their trick is to make all this grumbling seem such fun.

But among its managers, it seems the fun has given way just to grumbling...

I'm a mole, innit.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.