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Andy Coulson found guilty of phone hacking; Rebekah Brooks cleared of all charges

The outcome of the phone hacking trial at the Old Bailey.

Andy Coulson arrives at the Old Bailey. Photo: Getty
Andy Coulson arrives at the Old Bailey. Photo: Getty

Former News of the World editor and No 10 communications director Andy Coulson has been found guilty of conspiracy to hack phones.

Co-defendant Rebekah Brooks was cleared of all charges, including conspiracy to pervert the course of justice and conspiracy to commit misconduct in public office. Her husband Charlie Brooks was also cleared of all charges. Other verdicts are pending, as court reporter Peter Jukes explains:


This is what David Cameron said about his former spin doctor Coulson in the House of Commons on 20 July 2011:

I have an old-fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty. But if it turns out I have been lied to, that would be the moment for a profound apology. In that event, I can tell you I will not fall short.

The case is sure to be brought up during tomorrow's PMQs.

Following an eight-month trial, the verdicts so far are:

  • Brooks found not guilty on all charges.
  • Brooks' husband Charlie, the former head of News International security Mark Hanna, and Brooks' secretary Cheryl Carter all cleared of conspiring to pervert the course of justice.
  • Stuart Kuttner, managing editor of the News of the World, cleared of conspiring to hack phones.
  • Coulson has been found guilty of conspiring to hack phones. 

The jury, which has been considering verdicts since Wednesday 11 June, is still deliberating on further charges faced by Coulson and former News of the World royal editor Clive Goodman of conspiring to commit misconduct in a public office by paying police officers for two royal directories. Here's the Guardian's Lisa O'Carroll on this:

The Prime Minister will stand by his decision to apologise if Coulson were to be found guilty of hacking phones. Here's what a spokesman said:

During Treasury Questions in the Commons, Labour's Ed Balls asked George Osborne, who advised Cameron to hire Coulson, if he accepts that he damaged his own and the Treasury's reputation. 

Update, 14.50: David Cameron and Ed Miliband have now given statements on the verdicts. Cameron said: "I am extremely sorry that I employed him. It was the wrong decision and I’m very clear about that." Read his full remarks here

Ed Miliband said: “I think David Cameron must do much more than an apology – he owes the country an explanation for why he did not act.” Read his full statement.