The New York Times is worried about its success in the digital age of journalism. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

An internal New York Times report on its fear of digital competition is leaked - to BuzzFeed

BuzzFeed has obtained the New York Times' 'Innovation Report', an internal document detailing the "urgency" of moving into the digital world.

An internal report from the New York Times detailing the dire situation it's in as its "cadre of editors who remain unfamiliar with the web" lose out to digital journalism "upstarts" has been leaked – to digital journalism upstarts BuzzFeed.

The report, issued by a committee headed by the publisher's son, makes for depressing reading.

It discusses its competition from sites like BuzzFeed and Huffington Post – quoting an executive from the latter who remarked, "you guys got crushed" in the coverage of Nelson Mandela's death – and fears "our journalism advantage is shrinking as more of these upstarts expand their newsrooms."

"While we receive accolades for our digital efforts like ‘Snowfall', we nevertheless are at risk of becoming known as a place that does not fully understand, reward, and celebrate digital skills."

It also criticises the focus it has on the print edition's frontpage stories: "The newsroom is unanimous: we are focusing to much time and energy on Page One."

This document circling the brave new world wide web brings further embarrassment to the US broadsheet, after its abrupt dismissal of first female executive editor Jill Abramson less than three years into the job. She had reportedly confronted managers about the fact she was paid less than her male predecessor. This mole found that out on the internet, by the way, NYT.

I'm a mole, innit.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.