L'Wren Scott and Mick Jagger at her show at New York Fashion Week in 2012. Photo: Getty
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Mick Jagger on the front pages: so much for the post-Leveson chill

Four papers carried photos of the star at the moment he was told of his girlfriend's death. The chilling, censoring effect of the Leveson Inquiry that everyone was so worried about seems not to have kicked in yet. . .

Four papers have today carried pictures on their front pages of Mick Jagger at the moment he was told of his girlfriend's death.

The Mail:

The Mirror:

The Sun:

And the Daily Star:

L'Wren Scott, a fashion designer and stylist who had been with Jagger for thirteen years, was found dead yesterday morning. According to the BBC, “police said there was no sign of foul play and no note was found”.

The Editor's Code of Practice states:

In cases involving personal grief or shock, enquiries and approaches must be made with sympathy and discretion and publication handled sensitively

Is plastering every newsagent, coffee shop and petrol station in Britain with a zoomed-in picture of a man who has just heard his long-term partner has died following this guidance?

It seems the chilling effect of the Leveson Inquiry, which papers complained would curtail their ability to publish Very Important News, doesn't seem to have had much of an effect yet.

I'm a mole, innit.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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