The Israeli embassy comes to Buzzfeed

"Threats Facing Israel, Explained In One (sort Of Terrifying) Map".

The Israeli Embassy in the US is a community contributor to Buzzfeed, publishing a piece on the site headlined "Threats Facing Israel, Explained In One (sort Of Terrifying) Map".

The map presents what could charitably be described as a very one sided view of the Israel Palestine conflict, referring to the West Bank as having a "culture of conflict" and glossing over the continued illegal occupations in the area. "Some may say the map is alarmist," the embassy writes. "Undeniably, the map is our geopolitical reality, and we will be vigilant in protecting our people and our borders."

The piece is the latest example of the Iraeli state's impressive online PR operation. During the conflict in Gaza late last year, the IDF, Israel's army, took to Twitter sharing infographics about terror attacks on civilians and tweeting threats to "Hamas operatives". Meanwhile, the country's footsoldiers were allowed to use Instagram on deployment, as an official account collated the best pictures.

But while the Buzzfeed post isn't too unexpected for Israel, it's more problematic for the site itself. Unlike Instagram and Twitter, Buzzfeed produces editorial itself; and while the site allows "community contributors" to make posts with little oversight, to many users those pieces are indistinguishable from actual Buzzfeed content. Indeed, some of them are promoted to the front page by the site's editors, as "12 People Who Stuck Their Tongues Out Better Than Miley" was this morning. As a result, there's a risk that it will look like Buzzfeed endorses the message, and that's certainly what a fair few of the site's commenters seem to think.

Of course, there's another risk for the site: famously, its business model is based around creating sponsored content which blends seamlessly in with actual editorial. In more traditional media, the Israeli embassy would have had to pay for an advert to get their message across. But by offering the chance to post for free, are Buzzfeed undercutting themselves?

I'm a mole, innit.

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"