Ten things you won’t hear about while the press navel-gazes about Leveson and regulation

News keeps happening, some of it quite important.


1. The Department for Work and Pensions has introduced emergency legislation to "protect the national economy" from a £130m payout to jobseekers deemed to have been unlawfully punished. The so-called “Poundland” ruling would potentially entitle thousands of people to financial rebates after the court of appeal declared that almost all of the government's "work-for-your-benefit" employment schemes were unlawful. The legislation is will come before the Commons tomorrow as the Jobseekers (Back to Work Schemes) Bill.

2. Trent Mays and Ma'lik Richmond, the Steubenville high school football players, were found guilty of raping a 16-year-old after a party in August last year. It’s become a national story in the US – a CNN reporter was accused of being a “rape apologist”

3.  The Public Accounts Committee have declared HMRC’s handling of taxpayers’ calls has been "unambitious and woefully inadequate”. HMRC received 79 million calls in 2011-12, but 20 million of these calls were not answered. On top of that, just last week HMRC announced it was to close all of its 281 enquiry centres in 2014. 

4. The inquest into the death in prison of a man convicted of stealing a gingerbread man during the riots in 2011 opens today. He died in Wandsworth prison in August 2011. He had a history of mental illness and physical problems, which his foster family say were not addressed by the prison.

5. BP is taking legal action to limit the compensation it has to pay to people affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. The company says some of the claims being paid are "fictitious" and "absurd".

6. David Bowie is number one again, for the first time in twenty years.

7. Greek footballer Giorgos Katidis has been banned from playing for the national team for life after he made what's been called a Nazi salute after scoring the winning goal during a match on Saturday.

8. Another gang rape has taken place in India – five men have been arrested and two more suspects are wanted after a Swiss woman was attacked while camping with her husband in a forest on a cycling holiday.

9. There are fears that once the French withdraw from Mali next month, the remaining African forces wouldn’t be able to cope with a resurgent terror threat from al-Qaeda.

10. We’re not going to get spring until after Easter, apparently. What?


A navel to gaze upon. This one belongs to Rihanna. Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty Images
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The buck doesn't stop with Grant Shapps - and probably shouldn't stop with Lord Feldman, either

The question of "who knew what, and when?" shouldn't stop with the Conservative peer.

If Grant Shapps’ enforced resignation as a minister was intended to draw a line under the Mark Clarke affair, it has had the reverse effect. Attention is now shifting to Lord Feldman, who was joint chair during Shapps’  tenure at the top of CCHQ.  It is not just the allegations of sexual harrassment, bullying, and extortion against Mark Clarke, but the question of who knew what, and when.

Although Shapps’ resignation letter says that “the buck” stops with him, his allies are privately furious at his de facto sacking, and they are pointing the finger at Feldman. They point out that not only was Feldman the senior partner on paper, but when the rewards for the unexpected election victory were handed out, it was Feldman who was held up as the key man, while Shapps was given what they see as a relatively lowly position in the Department for International Development.  Yet Feldman is still in post while Shapps was effectively forced out by David Cameron. Once again, says one, “the PM’s mates are protected, the rest of us shafted”.

As Simon Walters reports in this morning’s Mail on Sunday, the focus is turning onto Feldman, while Paul Goodman, the editor of the influential grassroots website ConservativeHome has piled further pressure on the peer by calling for him to go.

But even Feldman’s resignation is unlikely to be the end of the matter. Although the scope of the allegations against Clarke were unknown to many, questions about his behaviour were widespread, and fears about the conduct of elections in the party’s youth wing are also longstanding. Shortly after the 2010 election, Conservative student activists told me they’d cheered when Sadiq Khan defeated Clarke in Tooting, while a group of Conservative staffers were said to be part of the “Six per cent club” – they wanted a swing big enough for a Tory majority, but too small for Clarke to win his seat. The viciousness of Conservative Future’s internal elections is sufficiently well-known, meanwhile, to be a repeated refrain among defenders of the notoriously opaque democratic process in Labour Students, with supporters of a one member one vote system asked if they would risk elections as vicious as those in their Tory equivalent.

Just as it seems unlikely that Feldman remained ignorant of allegations against Clarke if Shapps knew, it feels untenable to argue that Clarke’s defeat could be cheered by both student Conservatives and Tory staffers and the unpleasantness of the party’s internal election sufficiently well-known by its opponents, without coming across the desk of Conservative politicians above even the chair of CCHQ’s paygrade.

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.