The YSL catwalk: it's not just women's fashion that has a problem with extreme thinness

Male models at Hedi Slimane's show for Yves Saint Laurent looked ill, tired - and unhealthily skinny.

Hedi Slimane has always liked to use thin male models. At Dior Homme, his skinny silhouette is credited with moving the men's fashion industry as a whole to narrower cuts, and he inspired Chanel's Karl Lagerfeld to lose 90lb - on a regime of Diet Coke - to fit into his clothes.

But his show yesterday for Yves Saint Laurent at Paris fashion week was exceptional, even by his standards. This photo sums it up:

(Photo from Style.com)

While this model might be totally healthy, he doesn't look it. The skinniness of his thighs is also an extremely unrealistic shape for the vast majority of men to aspire to.

Here are a couple of the other models (photos from Getty)

Just how thin are these men? Well, a New York Times story about the increasing thinness of male models gave the vital statistics of Stas Svetlichnyy, as 6ft tall and 145lb (10st 5lb), with a 28-inch waist. And that's his "top weight", apparently. 

This being fashion, the reviews of the YSL show barely mentioned the extreme thinness of the models. The Washington Post observed that:

The styles were also very young, with slim pickings for older men.                    

. . .  which is a bit of an understatement, as I can't imagine many men over 30 have this body shape naturally. The influential fashion industry site Women's Wear Daily made reference to the models' shape very briefly, saying:

The first rocker out — pale and gaunt — pointed his Adam’s apple at the photographers and strode out in a lean tuxedo and black shirt, as cocky as Mick Jagger.

This is fetishising thinness, and the appearance of illness, as just another quirky aesthetic choice. And it's not healthy.

(hat-tip to @isaacjlock for the original picture)

The YSL 2013 F/W men's fashion show. Photo: Getty

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.