Birdwatchers are angry about the fake "eagle v baby" video

"Damaging mythology re: raptors"

The consensus is growing that the golden eagle v baby video is fake. I had my doubts given what looked like slightly messy CGI in the video, but the birdwatchers of the world are up in arms about it.

In the comments of the last piece, we were accused of "tweeting damaging mythology re: raptors":

While Barry has further thoughts:

The Black Swamp Bird Observatory agrees with the conclusion that it is faked, given that the bird is not a native to the Montreal area, but has a different take on how the fakery was achieved:

Neil Aldridge, a wildlife photographer tells Bird Watching magazine:

So why did this happen? Who would spread such damaging mythology re: raptors? One Fark user claims that there's a 3D animation school in Montreal which regularly produces similar hoaxes. Here's one from last year, for instance:

The animation's not as good, and the video doesn't have any of the canny tricks that the eagle one did to try and look real. But it's along similar lines, and was also taken in Montreal - though a different park. Case closed?

Update

Yes, case is indeed closed. The animation school, Centre NAD, has confirmed it was the source of the video:

 

The “Golden Eagle Snatches Kid” video, uploaded to YouTube on the evening of December 18, was made by Normand Archambault, Loïc Mireault and Félix Marquis-Poulin, students at Centre NAD, in the production simulation workshop class of the Bachelors degree in 3D Animation and Digital Design.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Labour slumps to fourth place in North Hykeham and Sleaford by-election

Conservative candidate Caroline Johnson eased to victory as Labour tumbled from second to fourth place.

Caroline Johnson was elected as the Conservative MP for Sleaford and North Hykeham, while Labour slumped from second to fourth behind Ukip and the Liberal Democrats, who finished second and third respectively. The by-election was triggered by the resignation of Stephen Philips.

The seat, which has been safely Conservative since its creation, backed Brexit by a 20-point margin on 23 June. The Tory victory, with 53.5 per cent of the vote, is one of the party’s all-time best by-election performances while in government. 

Johnson won with 17,570 votes. In second was Ukip's Victoria Ayling, with 4,426 votes. Ross Pepper recieved 3,606 votes, while Labour's Jim Clarke got 3,363 votes.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.