Birdwatchers are angry about the fake "eagle v baby" video

"Damaging mythology re: raptors"

The consensus is growing that the golden eagle v baby video is fake. I had my doubts given what looked like slightly messy CGI in the video, but the birdwatchers of the world are up in arms about it.

In the comments of the last piece, we were accused of "tweeting damaging mythology re: raptors":

While Barry has further thoughts:

The Black Swamp Bird Observatory agrees with the conclusion that it is faked, given that the bird is not a native to the Montreal area, but has a different take on how the fakery was achieved:

Neil Aldridge, a wildlife photographer tells Bird Watching magazine:

So why did this happen? Who would spread such damaging mythology re: raptors? One Fark user claims that there's a 3D animation school in Montreal which regularly produces similar hoaxes. Here's one from last year, for instance:

The animation's not as good, and the video doesn't have any of the canny tricks that the eagle one did to try and look real. But it's along similar lines, and was also taken in Montreal - though a different park. Case closed?


Yes, case is indeed closed. The animation school, Centre NAD, has confirmed it was the source of the video:


The “Golden Eagle Snatches Kid” video, uploaded to YouTube on the evening of December 18, was made by Normand Archambault, Loïc Mireault and Félix Marquis-Poulin, students at Centre NAD, in the production simulation workshop class of the Bachelors degree in 3D Animation and Digital Design.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.