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Watch: Iain Duncan Smith admits the Tories haven't "done the work" on their £12bn welfare cuts plan

What happened to hardworking people?

The Tories think they are the party of hardworking people, hardworking families, workers versus shirkers, strivers versus skivers.

How embarrassing then that their Work and Pensions Secretary, evil suited egg Iain Duncan Smith, admits his party hasn't "done the work" on their next round of spending cuts.

For a while the Conservatives have been dodging the question about where their projected £12bn of cuts to the welfare bill are going to fall. And apparently that's because they actually have no idea.

Watch his admission on the BBC's Daily Politics welfare debate here:

Video: BBC Two Daily Politics

If ever there was proof that the Tories' attack on welfare is purely ideological, with no actual policy-based thinking behind it, this is it.

Here's the transcript:

AN: Let me come – speaking of a benefits and welfare, let me come back to you  IDS. Now in March you said that you are – I quote you: ‘May or may not decide that it’s relevant to reveal to the British electorate where the £12bn of welfare cuts are going to come from in the next government’  if you win. Why don’t think it’s relevant that we should know?

IDS: Because we’d have to have done the work on it, that’s why and we’d have had to reached agreement as to exactly where those are. We’ve let know – the public know exactly one area which was that we’re going to freeze those benefits. That’s going to save between 2 and 3 three billion pounds and also – 

AN: About £2bn now with low inflation.

IDS:  - and we’re going to lower the cap to £23,000 which is average earnings. But as I said on the Marr programme more recently I said, you know, as soon as we have done the work and had it properly modelled then we will let everybody know what that is.

AN: Shouldn’t you have done the work before you come to the British people to ask for re-election?

IDS: Yes, but the key area here of course –

RR: Yes.

IDS: no, well okay, but the key area here is that everyone is very clear that after the next election, if you get a Conservative government we have already said that we will save £12bn from essentially working age benefits and we’ve said that. That’s very clear. But I have locked out – 

SW:  What I don’t understand is ... what you won’t cut.  If you’re clear  you won’t cut pensions, child benefit, disablement benefit. 

IDS: Yes. 

RR: Well he hasn’t completely about child benefit.

SW: Then why can’t you be clear about what you will cut?

IDS: Well because, as I said, the work that we do on this will be done in the spending room, we will announce that out at the time.

I'm a mole, innit.

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Police shoot man in parliament

A man carrying what appeared to be a knife was shot by armed police after entering the parliamentary estate. 

From the window of the parliamentary Press Gallery, I have just seen police shoot a man who charged at officers while carrying what appeared to be a knife. A large crowd was seen fleeing from the man before he entered the parliamentary estate.

After several officers evaded him he was swiftly shot by armed police.

Ministers have been evacuated and journalists ordered to remain at their desks. 

More follows. Read Julia Rampen's news story here.

Armed police at the cordon outside Parliament on Wednesday afternoon. Photo: Getty

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.