The Thick of It creator Armando Iannucci thinks the BBC should switch to subscriptions. Photo: Getty
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"It’s not filthy to make money" Armando Iannucci tells BBC to replace licence fee with subscriptions

The creator of The Thick of It Armando Iannucci is calling for the BBC to adopt a subscription model for people with laptops asking "what is a television?"

Alan Partridge, The Thick of It and Veep creator Armando Iannucci calls for the BBC to adopt a new subscription model in order to make more money.

In an interview with the Evening Standard, he suggested that subscriptions are the future for the BBC, dismissing the licence fee as something irrelevant to online television viewers:

The BBC should make a mint from the brand internationally. It needs a new attitude that says it’s not filthy to make money. As for the licence, you have people on laptops saying: ‘What is a television?’ There will be a subscription model.

Having been asked to clarify his idea, he has just this morning written a series of tweets outlining his proposal:

The BBC would make a fortune if it ran as a subscription service abroad. It's revered across the world, and rightly so.

It's also on cracking form. 'In The Flesh', 'The Wrong Mans', 'The Fall', etc, are part of a world class output.

Money made from subscriptions abroad would fund even better programmes at home and take pressure off falling license fee collection.

If the international model works, BBC could replace license fee at home with a subscription fee, set lower than current license fee.

Current exemptions would still apply. So no one would pay more for a subscription than they do now for a TV license.

The subscription would give you access to BBC archive too. We'd get a quality service at home, by ruthlessly selling ourselves abroad.

And he concluded his radical rethink of the BBC's business model thus:

I'm a mole, innit.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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