Daily Mail unhappy 40-year-old Kate Moss has 40-year-old knees

For the Mail, Moss' true age is revealed not by a portrait in the attic, but by the skin halfway up her leg.

Time waits for no woman, including Kate Moss. Celebrating her 40th birthday this week at some club in Soho with some of her celebrity friends (if you care about where and who, then by all means, the Mail's got your back on this), the paper's report included one peculiar detail:

As you can see from the photo, Ms Moss - like almost every human with legs - has a fleshy hinge in the middle for the purposes of aiding locomotion. We suppose that botox might tighten up the skin around there, but the thing with knees is they have to have a bit of give, so they can bend. That's quite crucial.

Page 3 of the paper version even included a helpful zoom-in on the offending leg-elbows.

This isn't the first time the Mail has focused on Ms Moss' knees - it was the focus of a headline back in 2007 - and even other magazines like Heat have found her knees shocking (somehow). Other female celebrities to come under fire for daring to be born with legs include Elle Macpherson, Kylie Minogue, Cindy Crawford, Heidi Klum, Eliza Doolittle, Tara Reid, Miley Cyrus, Eva Longoria and Nicollette Sheridan.

The scene inside a knee. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

I'm a mole, innit.

Photo: Getty
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Which CLPs are nominating who in the 2016 Labour leadership contest?

Who is getting the most CLP nominations in the race to be Labour leader?

Jeremy Corbyn, the sitting Labour leader, has been challenged by Owen Smith, the MP for Pontypridd. Now that both are on the ballot, constituency Labour parties (CLPs) can give supporting nominations. Although they have no direct consequence on the race, they provide an early indication of how the candidates are doing in the country at large. While CLP meetings are suspended for the duration of the contest, they can meet to plan campaign sessions, prepare for by-elections, and to issue supporting nominations. 

Scottish local parties are organised around Holyrood constituencies, not Westminster constituencies. Some Westminster parties are amalgamated - where they have nominated as a bloc, we have counted them as their separate constituencies, with the exception of Northern Ireland, where Labour does not stand candidates. To avoid confusion, constitutencies with dual language names are listed in square [] brackets. If the constituency party nominated in last year's leadership race, that preference is indicated in italics.  In addition, we have listed the endorsements of trade unions and other affliates alongside the candidates' names.

Jeremy Corbyn (11)

Clwyd West (did not nominate in 2015)

Folkestone & Hythe (nominated Andy Burnham in 2015)

Kensington & Chelsea (nominated Jeremy Corbyn in 2015)

Lancaster & Fleetwood (nominated Andy Burnham in 2015)

Liverpool West Derby (nominated Andy Burnham in 2015)

Leeds North West (nominated Jeremy Corbyn in 2015)

Milton Keynes North (did not nominate in 2015)

Milton Keynes South (did not nominate in 2015)

Newark (did not nominate in 2015)

Reading West (did not nominate in 2015)

Reigate (nominated Yvette Cooper in 2015)

Owen Smith (3)

Reading East (did not nominate in 2015)

Richmond Park (nominated Jeremy Corbyn in 2015)

Westminster North (nominated Yvette Coooper in 2015)