New Statesman, Art Director (maternity cover)

Looking for an Art Director for an initial six-month contract.

The New Statesman is looking for an experienced, enthusiastic and talented Art Director for an initial six-month contract.

The ideal candidate will:

  • Be comfortable working in a fast paced environment of a weekly magazine
  • Have a keen eye for detail and drive for perfection
  • Have the ability to work under pressure effectively on multiple projects
  • Have experience of leading a team
  • Have a interest in current affairs

We are looking for someone with experience of designing across multiple platforms, both in print magazines or newspapers and online. iPad design experience would be an advantage. You should be proficient in Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator and Quark Express.

The art director is responsible for:

  • Designing front cover on a weekly basis
  • Designing and managing layouts and flat plans
  • Managing the art team and retoucher
  • Managing the art budget
  • Art directing and managing special issues and projects
  • Commissioning cartoons and illustrations
  • Offering design support to other publications within the group
  • Oversight of the New Statesman iPad app

Salary: competitive, dependent on experience.

How to apply

Please send a CV and covering letter to deputy editor Helen Lewis at helen at newstatesman.co.uk with the subject line “Art Director Application”. Please attach any supporting materials as low-res PDFs or include a link to your online portfolio. Alternatively, you can apply by post to Helen Lewis, New Statesman, 7 John Carpenter Street, EC4Y 0AN.

Please include a 300-word appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of the design of the New Statesman magazine and website.

The deadline for applications is 1 August and the contract begins on 15 September

Photo: Getty
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Why Ukip might not be dead just yet

Nigel Farage's party might have a second act in it. 

Remember Ukip? Their former leader Nigel Farage is carving out a living as a radio shock jock and part-time film critic. The party is currently midway through a leadership election to replace Paul Nuttall, who quit his post following their disastrous showing at the general election.

They are already facing increasing financial pressure thanks to the loss of short money and, now they no longer have any MPs, their parliamentary office in Westminster, too. There may be bigger blows to come. In March 2019, their 24 MEPs will all lose their posts when Britain leaves the European Union, denying another source of funding. In May 2021, if Ukip’s disastrous showing in the general election is echoed in the Welsh Assembly, the last significant group of full-time Ukip politicians will lose their seats.

To make matters worse, the party could be badly split if Anne-Marie Waters, the founder of Sharia Watch, is elected leader, as many of the party’s MEPs have vowed to quit if she wins or is appointed deputy leader by the expected winner, Peter Whittle.

Yet when you talk to Ukip officials or politicians, they aren’t despairing, yet. 

Because paradoxically, they agree with Remainers: Theresa May’s Brexit deal will disappoint. Any deal including a "divorce bill" – which any deal will include – will fall short of May's rhetoric at the start of negotiations. "People are willing to have a little turbulence," says one senior figure about any economic fallout, "but not if you tell them you haven't. We saw that with Brown and the end of boom and bust. That'll be where the government is in March 2019."

They believe if Ukip can survive as a going concern until March 2019, then they will be well-placed for a revival. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.