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New Yorker cartoonist Leo Cullum dies

Cullum's brother said that he had been ailing from cancer.

Veteran New Yorker cartoon artist Leo Cullum died on Saturday in Los Angeles, reports The New York Times. He was 68.

Cullum's brother said that he had been ailing from cancer.

The gag cartoonist, who contributed 819 cartoons - the last of which was carried in the 25 October issue - over three decades to The New Yorker, was also a pilot for Trans World Airlines (TWA) and flew 200 combat missions in Vietnam.

Robert Mankoff, the magazine's cartoon editor said that Cullum was "one of the most consistently funny cartoonists we ever had."

According to Mankoff, Cullum, whose first cartoon for The New Yorker appeared in 1977, was one of the most popular cartoonists at the magazine.

Some of his cartoons were reprinted thousands of times.

Several of his cartoons were compiled into books. These included Scotch & Toilet Water?, Cockatiels for Two, Tequila Mockingbird, Suture Self and The Rejection Collection.

Cullum is survived by his wife and two daughters.