This is what Tinder is like for lesbians. Honest. Photo: Getty
Like so many things in life, Tinder is just different for lesbians
By Eleanor Margolis - 03 July 11:51

I feel like Tinder is a place where lesbians play badminton and drink iced tea, while straight women trawl through skips while dodging rotten turnips that are being lobbed at their heads.

Rolf Harris was convicted of 12 counts of assault. Photo: Getty
Rolf Harris guilty: but what has Operation Yewtree really taught us about sexual abuse?
By Bernard Gallagher - 01 July 11:22

As disturbing as they are, celebrity abuse cases are just a tiny subset of a much broader problem.

What is cyberbullying?
What is cyberbullying?
By Aoife Moriarty - 01 July 10:33

Cyberbullying became a major subject last year after a number of teen suicides linked to social network Ask.fm. But what is it, and how can we prevent young people from abusing each other online?

Rolf Harris arriving at Southwark Crown Court. Photo: Getty
Rolf Harris found guilty of indecent assault
By New Statesman - 30 June 15:08

The 84-year-old entertainer has been convicted of 12 attacks.

Students back the UCU marking boycott. Image: Vimeo
The student fight for all university staff to be paid a living wage
By Natasha Turner - 26 June 10:00

I believe it’s important that students uphold the employment standards that we would want to see for ourselves.

Full English: the MCC's chief executive (centre) and others at Lords 2011. Photo: Getty
I wear my egg-and-bacon tie with pride – MCC membership is my last link to civilisation
By Nicholas Lezard - 26 June 10:00

My politics may place me firmly on the left of Labour, but confess to owning an MCC tie and people start looking at you in a whole new light.

The England football team in Brazil. Photo: Getty
Who's to blame for England's failure at the World Cup? There's only one answer
By Phil Hartup - 24 June 18:27

... and it's not foreign players in the Premier League.

Playground for the rich: Tomson Golf Club in Shanghai. Photo: Alessandro Rizzi/Luz/Eyevine
The Chinese golf courses that don’t officially exist
By Simon Kuper - 20 June 12:00

The Forbidden Game uses golf – a game that most in the country probably still know nothing about – to gain a rare insight into ordinary Chinese lives. 

Photo: Getty
Is your GP a buzzer or a meeter? Sometimes, a diagnosis starts in the waiting room
By Phil Whitaker - 19 June 10:58

Sometimes, just going to greet a patient can make all the difference.

Lost in India: passengers on an Indian railway platform. Photo: Getty
Why did a man wake up on an Indian train platform with no idea who he was?
By Philip Maughan - 19 June 10:00

When David Stuart MacLean woke up in India with amnesia he assumed he was an addict who had overdosed. In fact, the only chemical he’d been taking was the prescribed antimalarial drug Lariam.  

These women like football. But it's OK if you don't. Photo: Getty
Women! If you don't like football, it's OK to say so
By Glosswitch - 18 June 15:15

Back in the 1990s, I used to pretend I liked football. Now I realise I had been taken in by the Football Mystique.

Technology can even free teachers from admin, leaving more time to devlote to pupils. Photo: Getty
The latest learning technology can raise standards of education for everyone
By Matthew Hancock - 18 June 12:25

To get the best out of it, investment in learning technology needs to be results driven.

Peggy Beaty as a maid in the play "The Five O'Clock Girl" in 1929. Photo: Sasha/Getty
Why I still tip a surly waitress after bad service
By Eleanor Margolis - 18 June 12:07

Refusal to massage every customer with niceness is, perhaps, a sort of personal strike. Why not support them by still giving a tip?

Luis Suarez and the Uraguay team train in Brazil ahead of the World Cup. Photo: Getty
My World Cup training is not going well but I am perked up by Uruguay’s most charming fan
By Hunter Davies - 13 June 11:48

In Sheffield, 96-year-old Tanya Schmoller will be cheering on Uruguay. After all, she attended the first ever World Cup finals, held in Uruguay in 1930.

Italy celebrate winning the World Cup in Berlin, July 2006. Photo: Getty
The last World Cup: after Brazil 2014, is the tournament finished?
By Jason Cowley - 13 June 10:00

Football is a supreme instrument of soft power and can unite people as little else can. But allegations of Fifa corruption have tarnished the image of the beautiful game. Can anything be done to save it?

A technician at the British Cricket Balls company tests balls in a wind tunnel, 1981. Photo: Getty
If you want to imagine England under Ukip, think back to cricket in the 1980s
By Ed Smith - 12 June 10:00

Back then when critics pointed out that England had been overtaken by hungrier and more progressive teams, a stock reply was ready: “But we’re English and we’ve always done it this way.”

Neigh bother: an Indian blacksmith changes a horse's shoe in Delhi, 2013. Photo: Getty
A day spent sole-searching affords me an unlikely victory
By Nicholas Lezard - 12 June 10:00

My motto, when it comes to buying shoes, is “as rarely as possible”. A shoe will have to be hanging off my foot and making flapping noises as I walk before I buy another one. 

Poland's Kamil Majchrzak serves against US player Noah Rubin at Wimbledon 2014. Photo: Getty
Ballet on Centre Court: how modern tennis fuses strength and grace
By Ed Smith - 12 June 10:00

Tennis has not become ugly. It has got more beautiful. Professionalisation did not ruin its balletic strand; it deepened it. The ultimate athletes turned out to be lighter, leaner and more mobile.

The 1982 Brazil World Cup side in action against Argentina. Photo: Getty
Why football loves beautiful losers
By Oliver Farry - 11 June 14:19

Sport’s love affair with the myth of thwarted victory.

Monster's ball: part of a float satirising Fifa for the Mainz Carnival in Germany, 3 March. Photo: Getty
Why Fifa is football’s dirtiest player
By Jon Holmes - 06 June 11:00

Last month’s rush to exonerate the Premier League’s CEO, Richard Scudamore, who had been accused of sexism, was just another example of the game’s eagerness to sweep dirty linen under the carpet.

FA chairman Greg Dyke poses with the executive's controversial report on the future of the England national team, which has angered Football League clubs. Photo: Getty Images
Football League clubs are in open revolt against the B team plans of the executives who represent them
By Martin Cloake - 06 June 10:53

The continued endorsement of Premier League B teams being given access to Football League competitions has led to an open rebellion by teams and their owners against the executives who are supposed to represent their interests.

Na-na-na, can't hear you: wife or husband does not always mean the wind beneath my wings. Photo: Getty
To cheer myself up, I think of other people’s dreadful marriages
By Nicholas Lezard - 05 June 12:25

When I encounter the words “my wife” or “my husband”, I get, in some dark moods, a choking sensation beneath the breastbone.

Claire Shipman and Katty Kay, authors of The Confidence Code. Photo: Stephen Voss/Redux/Eyevine
Talking about women’s lack of confidence may be counterproductive
By Alice Robb - 05 June 10:00

A new book by newscasters Katty Kay and Clare Shipman argues women’s timidity is holding them back at work – but does it perpetuate the idea that confidence is a masculine trait.

Far from Chelsea: diggers during the regeneration of Elephant & Castle in London. Photo: Getty
The bizarre secret of London’s buried diggers
By Ed Smith - 05 June 10:00

After excavating your mega-basement in Holland Park, it’s cheaper and easier to leave the JCB entombed down there with the pool, personal cinema and staff quarters. 

Only in designated areas: outdoor smokers in Melbourne, which may soon go completely smoke-free. Photo: Getty
Will Self: I don't decry the smoking ban but I do miss smoke
By Will Self - 30 May 12:12

Smoke draped a decent veil across interior vulgarities, while softening our loved ones’ hateful features. Designated smoking areas are an abomination. 

The original London diary: Samuel Pepys's journal. Photo: Getty
If only I had a diary, I’d be able to figure out what happened to the past seven years
By Nicholas Lezard - 30 May 12:02

Over the years, I have begun to see the attraction of going out less and less. I sit, like Mycroft Holmes in the Diogenes Club, daring anyone to talk to me.

Calling urbane, European managers such as André Villas-Boas "the gaffer" verges on surreal. Photo: Getty
Back to mine: why we still talk about footballers in the language of the pit
By Ed Smith - 29 May 10:00

They may earn millions and drive Maseratis but today’s footballers are still described using old working-class terminology. It’s the last link with the game’s roots. 

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